Accession A2015-074 - Hiebert and Brown family accrual

Title and statement of responsibility area

Title proper

Hiebert and Brown family accrual

General material designation

  • Textual record
  • Graphic material
  • Sound recording
  • Records in electronic form

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Accession

Reference code

CA UMASC MSS 386-A2015-074

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Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

Dates of creation area

Date(s)

  • 1880-2013 (Creation)
    Creator
    Hiebert, Brown Family

Physical description area

Physical description

6.1 m of textual & other material including 9,425 photographs, 221 negatives, 7 CDs, 5 audiocassettes & 3 sketches

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Archival description area

Name of creator

(1837-2013)

Biographical history

Erdman Penner (1837-1907) and Maria (Van) Eitzen (1840-1900) arrived on the International, the first boat of Mennonite immigrants to southern Manitoba, on July 3, 1874. They came from the Chortitza village of the Bergthal colony in southern Russia. Erdman started a merchandise business and opened a rafting supplies store along the railway line that was passing through Gretna. He became mayor of Gretna in (). The family spent winters in Winnipeg. In 1874, their daughter Helena Penner was born.

In the 1880s, the family moved to Mountain Lake, Minnesota where Helena continued her schooling. Helena, or Helen as she was also known, attended the University of Manitoba and became the first Mennonite woman to graduate from this institution when she did so in 1899. Helen also organized the Modern Language Club (the University Women’s Club) at the University of Manitoba. She is also known as the author of “Granny stories” – a memoir of Mennonite life on the prairies. Helen married Gerhard Hiebert in 1902 and settled in Winnipeg. They had three daughters: Helen Elfriede (Di) Allen (1908-1982), Gerda Louise Riddoch (1910-1980), and Catherine Elizabeth Brown (1918-2013). Helen Hiebert passed away in 1970.

Helen's husband, Gerhard Hiebert (1868-1934), was a prominent Winnipeg surgeon who became chief surgeon at the Winnipeg General Hospital (1917-1919). Gerhard’s parents were also Mennonites from southern Russia who took the Kenilworth ship from Antwerp and arrived in New York on July 17, 1876. They came from Berjansk village near Chortitza village and settled in Mountain Lake, Minnesota.

Gerda Riddoch received the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire O.B.E. from the Queen of England in 1970.

Catherine Brown graduated from the University of Manitoba with a B.Sc. in 1938. She often travelled to England to visit her sister Elfriede (Di) and her husband John Frank Allen. Catherine was accepted by St. Thomas Hospital in England to study physiotherapy. During the Second World War she returned to Canada and married her husband, Edward C. Brown. Catherine and Edward had three children: Shirley, Peter, and Kenneth. In 2005 Catherine Brown established the Dr. Gerhard Hiebert Memorial Bursary Fund, in memory of her father, at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Manitoba.

Edward Brown’s grandfather was the Hon. Edward Brown, provincial treasurer of Manitoba (1915-1917). Edward’s father, Wallace E. Brown, was an original grain merchant for Richardson and Sons, Ltd. from the 1920s to 1960.

Name of creator

Biographical history

Catherine Brown (nee Hiebert) was born on February 4, 1918 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Her grandparents Erdman Penner (1837-1907) and Maria (Van) Eitzen (1840-1900) arrived on the first boat of Mennonite immigrants to southern Manitoba on the International, July 3, 1874. They came from the Chortitza village of the Bergthal colony in southern Russia. Erdman started a merchandise business and opened rafting supplies store along the railway line that was passing through Gretna. He became a mayor of Gretna in (). The family spent winters in Winnipeg. In 1874, Helena Penner, Catherine’s mother was born. In 1880’s family moved to Mountain Lake, Minnesota where Helena continued her schooling. Catherine’s mother Helena Hiebert (nee Penner, 1874-1970) was the first Mennonite woman who graduated from the University of Manitoba in 1899. Helena Penner organized the Modern Language Club (the University Women’s Club) at the University of Manitoba. She is also known as the author of “Granny stories” – a memoir of Mennonite life on the prairies. Helena married Gerhard Hiebert in 1902 and settled in Winnipeg. They had three daughters: Catherine Elizabeth Brown (1918-2013), Gerda Louise Riddoch (1910-1980), and Helen Elfriede (Di) Allen (1908-1982). In 1970, Gerda Riddoch received the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire O.B.E. from the Queen of England. Catherine’s father Gerhard Hiebert (1868-1934) was a prominent Winnipeg surgeon who became chief surgeon at the Winnipeg General Hospital (1917-1919). Gerhard's parents were also Mennonites from southern Russia who took the Kenilworth ship from Antwerp and arrived in New York on July 17, 1876. They came from Berjansk village near Chortitza village and settled in Mountain Lake, Minnesota.
Catherine Brown graduated from the University of Manitoba with a BSc in 1938. She often travelled to England to visit her sister Elfriede (Di) and her husband John Frank Allen. Catherine was accepted by St. Thomas Hospital in England to study physiotherapy, an unknown field at that time. During the World War II she returned to Canada and married her husband Edward C. Brown. Edward’s grandfather was the Hon. Edward Brown, provincial treasurer of Manitoba (1915-1917). Edward’s father Wallace E. Brown was an original grain merchant for Richardson and Sons, Ltd. (1920's-1960).
Catherine and Edward had three children, Shirley, Peter, and Kenneth. The Hiebert-Brown family archives also include material on Catherine Brown’s famous cousin, Erdman Penner early cartoonist for Walt Disney (1930's-1950's) and Paul Hiebert (1892-1987), the Canadian writer and humorist, who was awarded the Stephen Leacock Medal for his book “Sarah Binks “ (1947) and “Willows Revisited” (1967). In 2005 Catherine Brown established the Dr. Gerhard Hiebert Memorial Bursary Fund, in memory of her father, at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Manitoba. Catherine entrusted the family archives to her daughter Shirley Brown who donated it to the Archives and Special Collections in 2012. The fonds represents stories, experiences and contributions of three generations of Mennonite-Northumberland family, painting a vivid picture of the life in Winnipeg, Manitoba in the first half of the 20th century.

Custodial history

The fonds were donated by Shirley Alice Brown in 2015.

Scope and content

The fonds consists of 13 series. They include Catherine Hiebert material, Edward Brown material, Edward & Catherine Brown family material, Hiebert family material, reseach material, scrapbooks (oversize). Photographs (hollinger format, tapes (hollinger format), electronic records (hollinger format), Cathie Hiebert oversize photo albums, Edward Brown oversize photo albums, Edward & Catherine oversize photo albums & oversize photographs.

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Language and script note

English

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Restrictions on access

There are no restrictions on access

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Associated materials

Paul Hiebert & Aileen Garland are family members.

Books have been removed from the collection.

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Accruals

No further accruals are anticipated.

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Dates of creation, revision and deletion

2016

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