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Ogilvie Flour Mills Company

  • ofmills
  • Collectivité

The Ogilvie family lineage can be traced back to 1750 when Katherine and James Ogilvie gave birth to a son, Archibald. He moved from Scotland to Canada with his wife, six of his eight children, £2000, and two fine French millstones. In 1811, Archibald’s third son, Alexander, joined his uncle John Watson in Montreal and added his millstones to his uncle's mill. Alexander married his cousin, Helen Watson. They had eleven children. Soon the Ogilvie milling dynasty would flourish.

Alexander Walker, the seventh son, formed a partnership with his uncle, James Goudie. Goudie retired in 1855 and relinquished his share of the business to Alexander’s younger brother, John. In 1872, a mill was built at Seaforth, Ontario, and two years later another at Goderich. By 1877, the competitors complained that the Ogilvies were cornering the market because they held two million bushels of wheat in their grain elevators. John Ogilvie died in 1888. In 1895, the Ogilvie company acquired Stephen Nairn’s oatmeal mill in Winnipeg. In 1900, William Watson Ogilvie died suddenly, and two years later, Alexander Walker Ogilvie passed away as well.

In May 1902, the executors of William Watson Ogilvie sold the flour mills and seventy elevators to a Canadian-owned syndicate. Charles Rudolph Hosmer was the president of the newly formed Ogilvie Flour Mills Co. Ltd. from 1902 to 1927. From 1912 to 1939, Ogilvie Flour Company were purveyors of flour to his Majesty, King George V, which indicated Ogilvie flour had been adopted by the royal household. In 1949, Gerber-Ogilvie Baby Foods Ltd. was formed and Ault Milk Products was purchased. In 1957, Ogilvie sold their fifty percent share of Gerber-Ogilvie Baby Foods Ltd. to Gerber, and in the same year Ogilvie-Five Roses Sales Ltd. was consolidated. Ogilvie bought control of Catelli stock in 1960. Between 1966 and 1996, Ogilvie Mills sold, purchased, and amalgamated with companies such as General Bakeries Ltd., Beatrice Foods Inc., Delmar Chemicals, Laura Secord Candy Shops Ltd., Catelli-Habitant Inc., Gourmet Baker Inc., among many others. In 1968, John Labbatt Ltd. bought out the 96% outstanding shares and Ogilvie became a subsidiary of Labbatt. In 1993-1994, Archer Daniels-Midland Co. of Decatur, Illinois purchased Ogilvie Mills from John Labbatt Ltd. At the time, the annual sales had reached $275 million.

In-depth history:

In 1163, Gilbride of Airlie, of the noble stock of Angus, knelt before William the Lion, King of Scotland, and arose O'gille Buidhe, in Gaelic parlance "of the family of the yellow-haired." Thus began the lineage of the hydra-headed clan of Ogilvies, Ogelvies, Oglivys & Ogilbies. Regardless of how the name was spelled, they were a formidable clan whose deeds traverse the path of Scottish history.

In 1750, Katherine & James Ogilvie celebrated the birth of their only son, Archibald. The family were tenant farmers in Stirlingshire, and, as the sole male heir, young Archibald grew to manhood and prospered. Fifty years later, as the father of eight with five sons to consider, Archibald realized that there was little prospect left in Scotland for his children. Britain was forced to maintain a large army during the Napoleonic Wars and a young man's choice was conscription or the payment of twenty pounds to provide a replacement. Ogilvie felt that his money could be better spent in the pursuit of an improved life for his family in Canada. He gathered his wife, three daughters, and his three youngest sons and set sail for the Colonies. In his possession were two thousand pounds and two fine French millstones. After thirteen weeks, his ship dropped anchor in the St. Lawrence River beneath the Plains of Abraham. Archibald first touched Canadian shores garbed in the family tradition, knee breeches and top boots, with his wig firmly queued beneath a beaver hat, advertising to all that he was a Scottish squire and a gentleman.

The Ogilvies’ arrival in Canada was impeccably timed as supplies that England normally imported from the Continent had been cut off by the War. The timber used in building ships for the Royal Navy, once taken from the Baltic States, was now coming from Canadian forests. The St. Lawrence was teeming with timber cruisers placing produce in heavy demand.

Archibald decided on a tract of wilderness in Howick, near the Chateauguay River, some twenty-five miles south of Montreal. The first season, he and his family tried to carve out an existence from the feral land. The rigours of farming in a harsh and unpredictable climate did not agree with Archibald. For a price, it was easy to rent a farm from the old Seigneurial holdings near Montreal. The following spring, Archibald handed over the Howick tract to his son William. Taking his wife, daughters, and namesake, Archibald leased the Ermatinger farm less than two miles from the waterfront in the current district of Maissoneuve. The third son, Alexander, retraced his footsteps back to Quebec City, setting up the two millstones at Jacques Cartier on the St. Lawrence. Only the swollen population brought on by the timber boom enabled a Scotsman to compete with the seigneurial mills, often in the hands of the local church.

That same year, 1801, John Watson, a maternal uncle of the Ogilvies, arrived in Montreal and set up his own mill. Watson chose Nun's Island Channel, where the river gains speed. An outbreak of cholera in Quebec City had a deleterious effect on trade. Ships would not enter the stricken port and Montreal was forced to import flour overland from New York at a cost of $16 a barrel. In 1811, Alexander joined John Watson at Nun's Channel adding his millstones to those of his uncle. In 1817, Alexander married his cousin, Helen Watson, and two years later took over the running of the mill following John's death.

The marriage of Alexander & Helen produced eleven children and it is this branch of the family that spawned the milling dynasty. The foundation was not built purely around the male heirs as many of the Ogilvie daughters married into prominent Canadian families. One daughter, Helen Ogilvie, married Matthew Hutchison who worked for many years as a flour inspector in Montreal and subsequently ran the Ogilvie mill in Goderich, Ontario. Margaret Ogilvie married George Hastings and four of their sons played prominent roles in the Lake of the Woods Milling Co. Ltd. Alexander's own sister, Helen, married James Goudie, the son of a Montreal merchant. Alexander grew tired of the milling business and wished to spend more time at his farm at Cote St. Michel, outside the walls of Montreal. He entrusted the running of the mill to his brother-in-law, James, who in 1837 attempted the bold venture of closing the Nun's Channel operation and opening a mill at the St. Gabriel Lock of the Lachine Canal. The new mill, situated in Montreal on a bottleneck to the sea, began to tap into the growing commerce and industry of the area.

Montreal experienced unprecedented growth in the early 1840's, reaching a population of 57,500. Alexander Walker Ogilvie, the seventh child of Helen and Alexander, wrote in his boyhood diary that the land of Montreal Island was becoming too valuable to farm and that he would have to chose another livelihood. But as was often the case in Colonial times, circumstances in Great Britain altered greatly the new Canadian boom.

The Irish potato blight of 1846 caused the removal of all duties on foodstuffs, eliminating any colonial preference and destroying Canada's advantage in the British market. Concurrently, the bottom fell out of the British railway boom. Timber crews came out of the woods that spring to find their logs unsaleable. The United States made matters worse by passing the Bonding Acts, designed to divert the growing traffic from Upper Canada into American ports.

Following the ebb, the flow of commerce of the Canadian economy rebounded by 1850. The lure of the Canadian west beckoned and with it came British investment companies willing to take a chance on any get-rich-quick scheme, often to the detriment of their investors. This influx of cash and the general optimism in the Canadian hinterland soon returned Montreal to prosperity. James Goudie and his nephew, Alexander Walker Ogilvie, witnessed huge grain shipments entering Montreal from the Lake Ontario settlements. As many as 500,000 bushels of wheat passed through Montreal on the way to Great Britain. Goudie and Ogilvie believed that there was a market for flour and formed a partnership in 1852. This injection of new blood into the company was vital, for the previous year Ira Gould had leased sufficient water from the Lachine Canal to operate several runs of millstones and had built the City Flouring Mill on lands adjacent to the Goudie-Ogilvie property. Gould's challenge forced Goudie and Ogilvie to renovate their operation. The resulting Glenora Mill added a new wing to the Goudie grist mill, relegating the older structure to storage space. The new mill stood four storeys high and contained equipment for such things as polishing barley. A steam engine was installed to assist the waterwheel.

Young Alexander Walker took to the milling business with exceptional zeal. The grain being produced in the older settlements was beginning to deteriorate, so he purchased grain from as far west as Niagara to assure the quality of his flour. He was also blessed with good fortune. In 1854, the Crimean War cut off Continental grain supplies, sending British buyers to Canada for wheat surpluses and available flour. At the same time, the American mid-west was burgeoning from squatters' shacks into full-fledged cities, eager to trade with Canada. That option was made all the easier when the United States passed the Reciprocity Treaty.

In 1855, James Goudie was able to retire knowing that Alexander was more than capable of running the business. He relinquished his remaining interest in the company to Alexander's younger brother, John, who had recently returned to Cote St. Michael to help his father, Archibald, run the family farm. The sign on the Glenora Mill now bore the name A.W. Ogilvie & Co. The brothers had scant opportunity to bask in their accomplishments. Eastern Canada's wheat was rapidly declining and a Commissioner of Crown Land's report in 1856 suggested that there remained little quality land to be settled east of the Great Lakes. Annexation by the United States posed a very real threat and Canadian survey parties were dispatched to the Far West in search of suitable land for an ever growing population. Minnesota and the Dakotas were already being settled and a mill at St. Anthony's Falls (Minneapolis) was grinding 120 barrels of flour daily. Glenora flour was selling well from the St. Lawrence to Newfoundland and into the Maritime Provinces. The Ogilvie brothers felt that expansion westward was the natural progression. John Ogilvie began to push westward, exploring new settlements and laying down offers to purchase against the upcoming harvest.

The 1860's brought another decade of feast and famine to the Canadian economy. Fortunately for the Ogilvies, they brought brother William Watson on board in 1860 to help navigate the company through the eddies of a turbulent time. Initially the American Civil War brought a huge increase to Canadian business, causing Montreal factories to operate non stop to cover all the war orders. More millstones were added to Glenora to keep up with the demand as the price of flour rose steadily. The Ogilvies rented extensive storage space to house all their grain pouring in from Western Ontario. However, at War's end, the victorious Union government took steps to block all Canadian imports, forcing many companies into ruin. A.W. Ogilvie & Co. was not among the casualties. The brothers’ cautious well organized approach to the milling business not only allowed them to ride out the rough economy but galvanized their position as one of the country's leading millers.

The company's new found security enabled a more pronounced division of labour amongst the brothers. John undertook the supervision of the family's interests in Ontario with an eye toward Western expansion. William Watson oversaw the administration of the company in Montreal, freeing Alexander to pursue public duties and to concentrate on the growing financial problems that were plaguing the flour industry. Alexander was elected to the Quebec Legislature by acclamation in 1861. His two terms in office were characterized by the most cordial of relations with his French-Canadian colleagues, for he spoke perfect French, albeit with a Scottish burr.

While administering a successful business, he still found time for a staggering list of responsibilities that included: alderman for the City of Montreal, Justice of the Peace, President of the Workingmen's and Widows' Benefit Society, President of the St. Andrew's Society, the St. Andrew's Home, Caledonian Society, Royal Montreal Curling Club, Life Director of the Montreal General Hospital, Director of the Exchange Bank of Canada, Sun Life Assurance Co., and the Montreal Building Society.

A trip to Europe brought Alexander in contact with the "Hungarian Process" of milling that combined stone and roller grinding. The method produced flour of such fineness that Ogilvie introduced the steel reduction rolls to his Glenora Mills in 1871. By 1874, his myriad of outside duties caused him to resign his position leaving William Watson in charge. In 1881, he was appointed to the Upper Chamber of the Senate. In 1884, Senator Ogilvie was one of a select few that toured the Western reaches of the Canadian Pacific Railway. C.P.R. General Manager, William Van Horne, held the Ogilvie name in the highest regard. When once asked by a visiting Brit what the national flower of Canada was, he replied, "Ogilvie flour of course."

The 1870's were years of expansion for the Ogilvies. In 1872, at John's behest, a mill with a 250 barrel capacity was built at Seaforth, Ontario. Two years later, a mill with twice the capacity and an elevator were built at Goderich. The elevator served the dual purpose of storing local grain as well as the water-born shipments from Western Canada. Later that year, John Ogilvie ventured to the Dakota Territory and purchased the first parcel of hard spring wheat to be shipped to Eastern Canada. The 800 bushels proved to be of magnificent quality. The success of this experiment led the Ogilvie's to push for the growing of hard wheat in the Canadian West. For ten years John Ogilvie was a lonely visionary to the potential bread-basket available on the Canadian Prairies. In 1881, a mill was begun in Winnipeg and the first elevator in Manitoba appeared at Gretna. This was a calculated move for the arrival of the first Manitoba hard wheat in Britain had been a sensation. The early tests on the Manitoba product confirmed a grain of unsurpassable quality. The first export of wheat from Western Canada occurred in 1885 when the Ogilvie's sent a small shipment from the Winnipeg Mill to Scotland. The company received a staggering offer from British military for a half million dollar shipment. An order that far outstripped the companies ready supply but was a harbinger of the untapped economic potential in the Canadian West. By 1887, the Ogilvies held two million bushels of Manitoba wheat in their elevators prompting competitors to complain that the company was out to corner the market. The future was so bright that not even the death of John Ogilvie in 1888 could dampen the desire to push westward.

The Ogilvies had no intention of selling wheat while the possibility of milling flour existed. They planned to tackle the rival Minneapolis millers head on and entered the British market on a major scale. To that end, the Royal Mill was erected in Montreal in 1886 with an adjoining 200,000 bushel elevator. This new mill gave the firm a total production capacity of 5,500 barrels per day. To solidify their strangle-hold on the industry even further, the company purchased City Flour Mills from the heirs of Ira Gould, in 1893. That same year, in view of widespread want and hunger in Winnipeg, Ogilvie presented five thousand pounds of Hungarian flour to the city relief committee. The Company further encouraged further gift-giving by other local firms.

William Watson Ogilvie, like his brother Alexander, had many civic responsibilities. He was President of both the Montreal Board of Trade and the Montreal Coin Exchange. He was the first flour miller to be elected President of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association and sat as a director with the Bank of Montreal, the Montreal Transportation Company and the North British and Mercantile Insurance Company. He was a member of the Montreal Harbour Board as well as being a Director of the Sailors' Institute.

In 1895, Ogilvie acquired Stephen Nairn's oatmeal mill in Winnipeg. That same year William Watson hosted a group of Minneapolis millers at a banquet in Winnipeg. One of the guests, C.A. Pillsbury of the great American milling combine, toasted the host as "the largest individual flour miller in the world."

G.R. Stevens, O.B.E., offers this interesting insight into the milling business in his book, Ogilvie in Canada Pioneer Millers 1801-1951: "During these pioneer years, when the milling industry was wracked with growing pains, a bitter struggle ensued between the millers and the farmers over the relative freight rates of wheat and flour. Few were as fortunate as the Ogilvies, who had both the raw material and the manufactured article to sell. In due course wheat won, with profound effects upon the milling industry. It became profitable to carry wheat rather than flour to centres of consumption; yet because of improvements in milling practice it did not pay to build little mills all over the place. A few large mills, strategically situated, proved the answer in Canada."

As the century drew to a close, new and well-equipped mills began to spring up in many British ports. This practice permanently effected the market for imported flour as four out of every five bags of flour consumed in Great Britain were ground locally. The fifth bag was invariably used as a blend. One of the companies lucky enough to cut into that final 20% share of the market was Ogilvie. G.R. Stevens used this quotation from the British Baker's Manual of 1898 to illustrate the high regard with which Ogilvie flour was held in the article, "Popular Penny Cakes for Counter Tray and Window": "For these lines there is something about Vienna flour which absent from nearly all of the others. There is only one flour that comes near it. That is made by Ogilvie's Royal Mill in Canada."

These words would have made fitting epitaphs for the two remaining Ogilvie brothers. After nearly a century in the milling business, the family was about to undergo a radical transformation. On January 12, 1900 William Watson Ogilvie died suddenly. In a fitting tribute the Montreal Stock Exchange suspended operations for the day. Obituaries from across Canada stressed the prominent roll that "The Miller King" played in the development of the North-West Territories.

Two years later on March 31, 1902, Alexander Walker Ogilvie died. The Montreal Gazette had this to say, "... the death of few men would leave a deeper feeling of regret, or recall more sincere esteem and respect."

On May 30, 1902, the executors of William Watson Ogilvie sold the flour mills and seventy country elevators to a Canadian owned syndicate. The new president was Charles Rudolph Hosmer, a Montreal financier, born in 1851. He took his first job as a telegraph operator in 1865, moving on to manage a Grand Trunk Railway office the following year. Hosmer became the manager of the Dominion Telegraph Co.'s Kingston office in 1870, joining the Buffalo office the following and becoming superintendent of the company in 1873 at Montreal. He held this position until the company merged with Great Northwestern Telegraph Co. In 1881, he effected the organization of the Canada Mutual Telegraph Co. He remained the president and general manager of this operation until he joined the Canadian Pacific Railway as head of the telegraph department in 1886. Hosmer retained general management of C.P.R. telegraphs until his retirement in 1899. He was a director of the Bank of Montreal, C.P.R., Postal Telegraph, Sun Life Assurance of Canada and several other companies. His term as president of the newly formed Ogilvie Flour Mills Co. Ltd. ran from 1902-1927.

The new company needed someone with a strong knowledge of the milling industry. Frederick William Thompson filled that role as the inaugural vice-president and managing director. He was born in 1862 and joined Ogilvie at the age of twenty. By 1889 he had been appointed manager of the company's business in the Northwest. Thompson took a prominent role in the federal election of 1911, speaking out against reciprocity with the United States and opposing wider Imperial relations. He died prematurely in 1912.

The original director with the longest seniority was Sir Montagu Allan, who sat on the board from 1902-1951. Allan was born in Montreal in 1860 and was the founder of the Allan Steamship Co. and Matilda Caroline Smith. He was President of the Merchant's Bank from 1901-1922. Allan was created a knight bachelor by King Edward VII in 1906 and decorated Companion of the Victorian Order in 1907.

The other two original directors were Sir George Alexander Drummond and Sir Edward Seaborn Clouston. Drummond was born in Edinburgh in 1829, emigrating to Canada in 1854. He was a manager of John Redpath and Son, sugar refiners of Montreal. In 1879, he founded the Canada Sugar Refining Co. In 1882, he was elected a director of the Bank of Montreal, advancing to the vice-presidency in 1887 and presidency in 1905. In 1904, he was knighted.

Clouston was the son of a Hudson's Bay Co. Chief Factor and was born at Moose Factory on Hudson's Bay in 1849. He joined the bank of Montreal as a clerk in 1865. By 1887, he had risen to assistant general manager and became a first vice-president in 1906. He was created a baronet in 1908.

Just prior to the sale of A.W. Ogilvie & Co. and the W.W. Ogilvie Milling Co., F.W. Thompson received the Duke and Duchess of York at the company's Winnipeg mill. The royal couple carried out the customary inspection and the Duchess was said to be impressed by the cleanliness of the facility. At the end of his Canadian tour the Duke succeeded to the title of Prince of Wales. On March 1, 1902, the W.W. Ogilvie Milling Co. received the Royal Warrant from the Comptroller of the Household as Flour Millers to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. When the Prince ascended the throne as King George V, the Appointment was terminated. However, in December 1912, a new Warrant was received as "Purveyors of Flour to His Majesty", an honour that the company held until December 11, 1939. The renewal of the Warrant indicates that the earlier recognition had not been a matter of protocol. It indicates that following the visit to the Winnipeg mill, Ogilvie flour had been adopted by the royal household.

The twentieth century has been one of far reaching expansion by the Ogilvie Flour Mills Co. Ltd. An overview of which is chronicled in point form below.

1906 - New mill opens at Ft. William only to have elevators slip into the Kaminestiqua River on May 26, 1906.

1907 - Ogilvie Benefit Fund established.

1908 - Company announces formation of the Western Division comprised of Winnipeg Flour and Oatmeal and the rebuilt Ft. William Terminal Elevator.

1912 - Death of F.W. Thompson, Vice-President and Managing Director. He is replaced by W.A. Black.

1913 - Mill built at Medicine Hat.

1923 - Ogilvie buys Alberta Milling Co. at Edmonton.

1927 - W.A. Black ascends to the Ogilvie Presidency following the death of C.R. Hosmer.

1929 - Construction begun on Toronto office.

1930 - The Tree Line Shipping Co. and its thirteen vessels was purchased.

1935 - After 52 years with the company, W.A. Black retires and J.W. McConnell takes over as president.

1937 - The Company's publication, "The Jolly Miller", made its debut in January and recorded Ogilvie history until 1969. The inaugural issue had a quotation from President McConnell that a successful business depended upon "honesty, quality and service."

1939 - Ogilvie received order for the exclusive supply for flour and rolled oats for the pilot train, the Royal train and all other official residences of the Royal party during the forthcoming visit to Canada of their Majesties King George VI and Queen Elizabeth.

1940 - C.A. Dunning succeeds J.W. McConnell as President. Montreal Cereal and Feeds Mill is built. Miracle Feeds are introduced.

1941 - Capacity of the Edmonton mill was doubled.

1943 - The plant at Ft. William is equipped for the production of wheat starch and gluten.

1944 - Medicine Hat power plant was converted to electricity over from coal.

1946 - Five years in its completion, the new Royal Mill opens in Montreal with a daily capacity of 15,000 bags.

1947 - C.A. Dunning becomes Chairman as G.A. Morris replaces him as President. Ogilvie first introduces ready mixes.

1948 - January - Fire destroys Ogilvie elevator at Maple Creek, SK. May - Ogilvie donates an entire carload of Royal household flour to the British Columbia Flood Relief Committee.

1949 - Gerber-Ogilvie Baby Foods, Ltd. formed to process cereals and strained foods for infants and children. Ault Milk Products was purchased from the Ault family.

1950 - New office and warehouse built in Winnipeg.

1952 - Medicine Hat established a research laboratory. N.H. Davis replaces the retiring G.A. Morris as President. Ogilvie becomes a sponsor for the popular children's television show Howdy Doody.

1954 - Purchase of Lake of the Woods Milling Co.

1955 - Industrial Grain Products Ltd. commenced operation at its new Monosodium Gluten plant adjacent to the Royal Mill in Montreal.

1956 - Lake of the Woods Mills at Brampton and Medicine Hat were closed and the capacity of the Ogilvie plant at Medicine Hat significantly increased. A new pneumatic milling unit was installed at the Royal Mill in Montreal. The Montreal Warehouse of the Lake of the Woods Milling Co. was sold. Lake of the Woods joined the Ogilvie Benefit Fund.

1957 - The sale of Ogilvie and Lake of the Woods products was consolidated in Ogilvie-Five Roses Sales Ltd. Ogilvie's 50% in the Gerber-Ogilvie Baby Foods Ltd. was sold to the Gerber Products Co. in the United States. Ogilvie-Five Roses left the baby food business. The old Ogilvie Glenora Mill on Seigneurs St. in Montreal was sold. Vital gluten was added to Industrial Grain Products line of produce.

1958 - February - Ogilvie flour shed and Alberta Pacific grain elevator, at Turin, AB, are destroyed by fire. The old Lake of the Woods head office building on the corner of St. John and St. Sacrament Streets in Montreal was sold.

1959 - The country elevators of Ogilvie and Lake of the Woods including the terminal elevator at Ft. William were sold.

1960 - Ogilvie bought control of Catelli stock in January. That same month, N.H. Davis announced his retirement. He was succeeded by Arthur Atkins. Ogilvie-Five Roses became the new sponsor of Tommy Hunter's C.B.C. radio show. Construction began on Catelli plants at Transcona and La Prairie, Quebec.

1961 - The McGavin group of Bakeries in Western Canada, in which Ogilvie had a substantial interest, consolidated their businesses with those of Canadian Bakeries and Canada Bread Company to form McGavin Toast Master Ltd. The sales department of Western Canada underwent a reorganization. The five regional sales forces were amalgamated into two divisional groups. Vancouver became headquarters for the Alberta and British Columbia division while Winnipeg headed up the division for Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Western Ontario. The sales department at Medicine Hat was moved to Edmonton. The Medicine Hat plant installed three gigantic Butler Bins increasing the mills capacity to 509,200 bushels.

1962 - Ogilvie introduced its first bulk feed truck. The company purchased the assets of Edmonton Produce Company in Edmonton and formed a new company, Edmonton Produce (1962) Ltd. to process poultry products.

1963 - A research facility was established adjacent to the Royal Mill in Montreal. A new unit was added on to the Winnipeg mill. The first Russian order, a purchase of 575,000 long tons of flour from Canadian Mills to be shipped between Oct. 1963 and July 1964 resulted in a 33% increase in Canadian flour production. Ogilvie's share of this massive order was over 30% resulting in all their mills running to capacity. The Lake of the Woods Mill in Medicine Hat was reopened for the first time in seven years to meet the demand. 1964 - Ogilvie purchased almost all of the outstanding Class "A" common shares (non- voting) of Catelli Food Products Ltd.

1965 - Ault Milk Products Ltd. opened a cheese plant at Winchester, Ontario.

1966 - Ogilvie, through Inter-City Baking Co. Ltd. purchased the outstanding shares of Consolidated Bakeries of Canada Ltd. The Romi Foods Ltd. plant in Toronto was purchased by Catelli. The Ogilvie board approved construction of a Catelli plant in Trinidad. On September 1st Arthur Atkins retired as President and was replaced by J.W. Tait.

1967 - The Company's flour mill and warehouse at Keewatin were destroyed by fire on July 3rd. Out of the insurance claim, the Pillsbury Mill at Midland, Ontario was purchased to supply the Ontario market. Several Ogilvie subsidiaries amalgamated under the name Catelli-Habitant Ltd., later the name was changed to Catelli Ltd.

1968 - Ogilvie introduces Five-Roses gravy maker & sauce maker. General Bakeries Ltd. purchased the bakery businesses formerly operated by Consolidated Bakeries of Canada Ltd. and Inter City Baking Company Ltd. On January 26, John Labatt Ltd. made an offer to the shareholders of Ogilvie to purchase common shares for a consideration per share of one Convertible Preferred Share, Series A, of a par value of $18 plus $2.10 in cash. The offer was accepted by the holders of 96% of the outstanding shares and Ogilvie became a subsidiary of John Labatt Ltd. The corporate organization of the Company was revised to provide for four operating divisions, namely Package Foods Division and Industrial Division, a Starch and Chemical Division, a Food Service Division, and a Feeds Division, together with a supporting central staff. The fiscal year-end was changed from August 31st to April 30th. Ogilvie purchased the assets and undertaking of the Food Products Division of Cham Food Ltd. of Winnipeg, the assets of Dyck's Hatcheries Ltd. Man.-Ont., Poultry Farm Eggs Ltd., the egg processing business and assets of the Borden Co. and the milk plant of the Borden Co. at Kemptville, Ontario. The company's poultry processing operation in Edmonton was discontinued and the plant was rented to Canada Packers Ltd.

1969 - John Labatt Ltd. purchased Manning's Inc., a food service company in the Western United States. Based in San Francisco, Manning's operated a food service management for clients in several states and owned a chain of 25 cafeterias and a prepared food manufacturing plant in Eugene, Oregon. The company also roasted and sold coffee to the food service industry. The starch plant in Ft. William underwent a major modernization. Ogilvie sold its 91.5% interest in Malcolm's Condensing of St. George, Ontario to Beatrice Foods Inc. of Chicago. The head office personnel of the Food Service Division were transferred to Toronto from Montreal. The Ogilvie flour mill in Edmonton was closed down and eventually demolished. Ault Milk Products Ltd. undertakes $1,000,000 expansion program. Already the largest milk production plant in the country, Ault intends to become more involved in food processing with instant powder, cheese portions, and butter patties.

1970 - The operating of the Company was realigned into two groups, namely Industrial Products Group and Consumer Food Products Group. Delmar Chemicals and D.C. Sales were purchased by Ogilvie from John Labatt Ltd. Strathroy Flour Mills Ltd. was purchased as a going concern. Ogilvie's Quebec City warehouse was sold as was Catelli's pasta plant in Transcona. Ogilvie common shares were de-listed from the Montreal and Toronto Stock Exchanges. Production capacity was substantially increased at Catelli's Montreal pasta plant.

1971 - La Boulangerie Nationale Ltee., Dyson's (Ontario) Ltd., Edmonton Produce (1962) Ltd., and Les Porcheries Canadiennes Ltee. all surrendered their charters. Dyck's Hatcheries Ltd., Cal-Ed Poultry Farm Eggs (Edmonton) Ltd. and Man-Ont. Farm Eggs Ltd. all transferred from the Agri-Products Division to the Feeds Division. A major expansion was completed at the Ault plant in Winchester, Ontario. Laura Secord puddings were introduced into the market place.

1972 - Boulangerie Joseph Martin Ltee., Boulangerie Medard Paquette Ltee., and Medicine Hat Milling Co. all surrendered their charters. All assets of the Ogilvie Benefit Fund were transferred into the fund for Ogilvie's pension plan for salaried employees. The plan then assumed the liability for pensions being paid and certain future ones. Construction began on a new starch plant at Candiac, P.Q., destined to double the Company's starch and gluten production. Ogilvie sold its warehouses in Toronto, Vancouver, and Calgary. Construction began on Catelli's asceptic canning plants, the first of its kind in Canada.

1973 - The company's holdings of all outstanding shares of Catelli-Habitant Inc. of Manchester, New Hampshire were sold to Manning's Inc. The operating assets of Delmar Chemicals were sold to Manning's Coffee Co. The assets of Cham Foods and Man.-Ont. Poultry Farm Eggs Ltd. were sold. Ault Foods Ltd. purchased the milk quotas of Casselman Creamery Ltd.

1974 - Catelli Ltd. acquired from the public and associated companies all the outstanding shares of Laura Secord Candy Shops Ltd. and subsequently sold substantially all its assets and undertaking to Laura Secord Candy Shops Ltd. As a result, the Catelli operation was carried on by the Catelli Division of Laura Secord. A serious explosion and subsequent fire closed the starch plant at Candiac for several months.

1975 - The name of the Ogilvie Flour Mills Co. Ltd. was changed to Ogilvie Mills Ltd. - Les Minoteries Ogilvie Ltee. Ault Foods sold all of its assets to Laura Secord Candy Shops in exchange for Laura Secord shares. The name of Laura Secord Candy Shops was changed to Ault Foods (1975) Ltd. - Les Ailments Ault (1975) Ltee. Ault Foods Division of Ault Foods (1975) purchased the milk processing and dairy products operation of Cow & Gate Ltd. in Eastern Ontario, approximately doubling the company’s fluid milk capacity. The name of Ault Foods Ltd. was changed to Ault Creamery Ltd. The breeder farm at Dyck's Hatchery was sold.

1976 - Miracle Feeds Division withdrew from the dry formula feed business in Western Canada and sold its Otterburne feed mill. The Edmonton feed mill closed down. Ault Foods sold its plant in Brockville, Ontario. The ownership of the land on Mill Street in Montreal, associated with the Company's Royal Mill, was transferred to Ogilvie by the Crown in settlement of the loss of water rights under former leases, resulting from the closing of the Lachine Canal. Property of Dyck's Hatcheries Ltd. at Niverville, Manitoba, known as Apex Farms, was sold. Canada Grain Export Co. wound up and was dissolved. Ogilvie acquitted the rights to a lease of land next to its Royal Mill property in Montreal, on which it proposed to build a new warehouse and production staging facilities. Miracle Feeds Division purchased all of the assets of Rothsay Concentrates Ltd. as a going concern. Glenora Securities Inc., a former investment subsidiary of Ogilvie, was dissolved and surrendered its charter.

1978 - Guy St. Pierre replaces J.W. Tait as president and CEO of Ogilvie.

1983 - Miracle Feeds negotiates an agreement with Kellogg's of Canada to handle all the grain by-product produced by Kellogg's manufacturing plant in London, ON. Miracle also opens offices in Perry, GE and Belleville, IL.

1985 - January- Ogilvie purchases the food ingredients division of the Henkle Corp., in Keokuk, IO establishing the company as the world's largest gluten and wheat starch producer and providing a modern production facility in the American mid-West. April - Ogilvie purchases Murphy Products Inc., effectively doubling Miracle feeds sales volume and providing the infrastructure for American expansion. December - $1,700,000 investment converted the Candiac plant to Hydro-Cyclones.

1986 - September - Guy St. Pierre is the keynote speaker at the 100th anniversary of the French National Miller Association hosted in Quebec City. December - The 685' lake freighter, S.S. Stadacona, slammed into the wharf at Ogilvie's Midland elevator causing extensive damage.

1987 - September - Ogilvie Flour produces 52,000 tons of flour, the largest month volume in the company's 186 year history.

1988 - Guy St. Pierre resigns as president and CEO, to be replaced by Terry McDonnell.

1989 - January - Ogilvie announces the purchase of 50.5% controlling interest in Tenstar Aquitane, an established wheat starch and gluten producer in Bordeaux, France. May - Ogilvie commences production on a state-of-the-art Oat Mill in Midland, ON. October - Ogilvie acquires Woodstone Foods Ltd. of Portage la Prairie, MB, a manufacturer of vegetable fibres, proteins, and starches extracted primarily from Western Canadian peas.

1990 - March - Ogilvie purchases Ross Foods of Winnipeg, MB, initiating the company into the frozen bakery products business. May - Ogilvie purchases Gourmet Baker Inc., one of Canada's leading frozen dessert and bakery manufacturers. Gourmet Baker is a national supplier of sheet cakes, torts, cheesecakes, fruit and cream pies, as well as laminated and puff-pastry products to in-store bakeries and the Canadian food service industry. May 10 - 105 year old Ogilvie Oats building in Winnipeg about to become obsolete by year end, burns to the ground.

1992 - May - Ogilvie starch team create Wallstar, a wall paper adhesive for the Collins and Aikman plant in Platsburg, NY. In May, John Labatt Ltd. reached an agreement with Archer Daniels-Midland Co. of Decatur, Illinois to sell off the Ogilvie flour milling division. Labatt had been eager to sell off the Ogilvie division after a proposed merger with Maple Leaf Foods Inc. was turned down by the federal Bureau of Competition Policy in

  1. Ogilvie owned plants in Montreal, Midland and Strathroy, Ontario, and Medicine Hat, Alberta. The company had 925 employees at the time of purchase.

1993-1994 - ADM purchased Ogilvie Mills, the largest miller in Canada and a world leader in production of starch, gluten, and other wheat ingredients, with annual sales of $275 million. The flour-milling business arm of the new conglomerate then signed long-term supply contracts with the Toronto-based food and retailing giant George Weston Ltd, United Oilseeds Products Inc., a canola crushing plant in Lloydminster, Alta., (which was jointly owned by United Grain Growers Ltd. of Winnipeg and Mitsubishi Corp. of Japan), and the agriculture operations of International Multifoods Corp. of Minneapolis, a business that included 11 feed mills and a chicken hatchery in Canada.

1994 - June 6th - 115 workers of ADM Milling walked off the job in a dispute over job security and seniority rights.

1995 - Strike ends September 20th.

1996 - In May, Archer-Daniels-Midland Co. has an agreement with Maple Leaf Mills from Maple Leaf Foods and ConAgra Inc.

1997 - March 1st - The Competition Bureau announced that it will file a consent with the Competition Tribunal requiring ADM Agri-Industries Ltd. to sell the Maple Leaf flour mill on Oak Street in Montreal and to maintain certain supply obligations to the eventual buyer of the mill. In meeting this stipulation the bureau will allow ADM to acquire the assets of Maple Leaf Mills, a deal that had been in the works for over a year. This deal was never ratified. October 31 - Arson claims Ogilvie plant in Winnipeg, MB.

Oberman, Sheldon

  • oberman_s
  • Personne
  • 1949-2004

Sheldon Oberman, known as "Obie" to friends and family, was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1949. Oberman grew up as an only child in the immigrant North End, where he lived with his parents above their clothing store on Main Street. After graduating from St. John's High School, Oberman took a job as a dish washer and cook on the Canadian Pacific Railway Transcontinental. During the early seventies, Oberman continued to travel through Canada, as well as to Europe and the Middle East before returning to Winnipeg. In 1972, Oberman received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Winnipeg and a Certificate of Education from the University of Manitoba in 1974. Between degrees, Oberman married his first wife, Lee Ann Bloc, with whom he had two children, Adam and Mira. By 1975, Oberman was working as an English and Drama teacher at Joseph Wolinsky Collegiate, where he continued to work for the next 30 years. In 1985, Oberman met Lisa Dveris, the woman who was to become his second wife, life partner, and mother to his third child, Jesse. During his early married and working life, Oberman experimented with writing, attending a creative writing program taught by author W.O. Mitchell at the Banff School of Art. Throughout his life, Oberman drew creative inspiration from interacting with children, as well as reminiscing on his childhood in the North End. Besides touring North America as a professional storyteller as well as writing countless short stories, poems, and articles, Oberman wrote lyrics for children’s entertainer Fred Penner. Five of the albums released by Penner that featured Oberman’s songs received Juno nominations. Especially well-known for his writing of children’s books, Oberman published 12 in his lifetime, including TheAlways Prayer Shawl, an award winning story about the inevitability of change and the importance of tradition. Oberman received many awards and honours for his writing, including a short-listing in 2000 for the Governor General’s Award for The Shaman’s Nephew, which went on to win the Norma Fleck Award. In the last years of his life, Oberman wrote and published The Island of the Minotaur (2003), a collection of myths about Crete. Oberman’s final project, a collection of Jewish folktales, has been published posthumously. Besides writing, Oberman acted and directed in films and plays throughout his lifetime. In the 1980s, Oberman produced the films Vind Hammen (House of the Wind) and The Amazing Creation of Al Simmons. These two films are distributed by the Winnipeg Film Group. A highly diverse individual, Oberman also received a certificate in hypnosis training and created art installations from objects found at local garage sales. Oberman’s creative spirit knew no bounds. On March 26, 2004, Oberman died of cancer.

Nelson, Colleen Helgason

  • nelson_c
  • Personne
  • 1932-

Colleen Helgason Nelson was born on September 30, 1932 in Bismarck, North Dakota. She entered the University of Minnesota in 1950, graduating summa with a B.A. in Music (piano) in 1955. The previous year she married Carl Robert Nelson, an architect. The couple had seven children together. After spending a year in Rome, where her husband studied as a Fulbright Scholar, Nelson entered graduate school at the University of Illinois in 1957. She graduated in 1961 with an M.Sc. Her thesis was titled Six Sparrows of the Northern Great Plains: Descriptive Ecology. While a graduate student, she produced an exhibit for the James Ford Bell Museum of Natural History in Minneapolis. In 1962, she began research on downy waterfowl at the Delta Waterfowl Research Station at Delta, Manitoba. The following year, she continued her research at the Round Lake Waterfowl Station in Minnesota. The following year, she immigrated to Canada, where her husband took a position with the University of Manitoba. In 1967, she started doing museum and library exhibitions on downy waterfowl at the Museum of Man and Nature and at a studio-laboratory at home. In the next twenty years, she mounted over a dozen exhibitions and wrote several articles on waterfowl. In 1977, she was named a research associate at the Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature. In 1981, she was named a research associate of National Museum of National Sciences in Ottawa. In 1993, the results of her thirty years of research were published in Downy Waterfowl of North America (Delta Station Press).

Hamilton Family

  • hamiltonfamily
  • Famille
  • 1873-

On November 27, 1873 a fourth son, Thomas Glendenning Hamilton, was born to James and Isabella (Glendenning) Hamilton of Agincourt, Ontario. Agincourt, then a section of the Borough of Scarborough, is now part of Metropolitan Toronto.

In 1883, this Scottish-Canadian family moved west and homesteaded in Saskatchewan. They lived in a sod hut on the bank of the Saskatchewan River on a site which is now part of the city of Saskatoon. The Hamiltons were one of the first pioneer families to settle in Saskatoon and did much to further the community and cultural life of the tiny settlement.

In 1884, Saskatoon's first school was opened and a literary society was organized with James Hamilton serving as the society's first president. The years 1884 to 1885 also witnessed the second northwest rebellion. During the uprising the Hamiltons sheltered the wounded and otherwise assisted the Canadian troops who had been sent to stop the insurrection.

Shortly after the fighting ceased, James Hamilton died. The family was soon further saddened by the death of the only daughter, Margaret. Mrs. Hamilton and her five sons continued to farm the homestead until 1891 when the family moved to Winnipeg in order that the boys might secure a better education. The eldest son, Robert, was already working as an electrician in Winnipeg and John, the second son, had left to teach school in British Columbia when Mrs. Hamilton and her youngest son "Willie" left by train for their new home. The other two boys, James and Thomas, covered the eight hundred miles to Winnipeg by pony and buckboard and, for the last several miles, on foot.

Both James and Thomas attended Manitoba College. Upon graduating, they taught school for a period in order to raise the funds to enter medical school. Thomas graduated from medical school in 1903 and completed his internship at the Winnipeg General Hospital in 1904. He established residence and commenced practice in the district of Elmwood, where he continued to live and work throughout his career.

On November 26, 1906 he married Lillian May Forrester of Emerson, Manitoba. Miss Forrester had graduated in 1905 from the Training School for Nurses - Winnipeg General Hospital and had received the top award for "Highest General Proficiency". The Hamiltons were to have four children--Margaret, Glen, James and Arthur.

From the many accounts written by his friends and associates, as well as from his own letters, publications and lecture notes, Dr. Hamilton emerges as a calm, thorough, painstaking individual. For the next twenty-nine years he was to dedicate these admirable qualities to the service of his fellow man through his church and his profession, on civic committees, as a member of the provincial legislature and as a punctilious investigator of the metapsychic. A faithful Presbyterian, he was a loyal member of King Memorial Church Session and Congregation. In 1907 he was elected and ordained an Elder, became a trustee of the church property and later served as the chairman of its building committee.

He was elected School Trustee for Winnipeg's Ward Seven in 1906 and was re-elected by acclamation the following year. Altogether, he served on the Public School Board for nine years, one year as chairman. Some notable achievements of the Winnipeg Public School Board during his years of service were the introduction of fire drills in the public schools, free medical examinations for the students, and supervised playground activities during the summer months.

In July 1914, "TGH" (as he was frequently called) became actively involved in provincial politics. He ran as a Liberal candidate to the 14th Manitoba Legislative Assembly and was narrowly defeated by the Conservative nominee, H.D. McWhirter. Owing to maladministration and scandals involved in the construction of the Parliament Buildings, the 14th Legislature was short-lived. On the resignation of the Roblin Government on May 12, 1915, Lieutenant Governor Sir Douglas Colin Cameron called upon the Honourable Tobias Crawford Norris, Leader of the Liberal Party of Manitoba, to form a cabinet. The difficulties of governing with a minority government soon prompted Premier Norris to appeal to the electorate, a move which returned the Norris Government with a large majority of the vote. Thomas Glendenning Hamilton had again presented himself as a candidate and, this time, was elected as Liberal representative for Elmwood with an overwhelming majority.

The 15th Legislative Assembly was one of impressive achievements. It was this government which brought about the enfranchisement of women (January 28, 1916) and amended the Municipal Boundaries Act. Because of the strict liquor laws, there had been a strong reaction towards drugs. A new Pharmaceutical Act sought to curtail the sale of cocaine and morphine and to confine it to doctors' prescriptions. Women became eligible for civic offices (March 8, 1917), the Mothers' Allowance Act was passed (March 10, 1917), the Election Act was amended and Proportional Representation introduced. The Public Health, Charity Aid, Workmen's Compensation, Public School and Prison Reform Acts were passed. Legislation with respect to conservation of natural resources was also effected and Widows' Pensions introduced. It was this Legislative Assembly which saw the completion of Manitoba's beautiful Parliament Building.

On scanning the Manitoba section of the Canadian Parliamentary Guide 1916 "Sketches of Members", it becomes plain that few, if any, members of the 15th Legislative Assembly entered the Legislature with such a proven record of community action as Dr. Hamilton. His impressive services in that Assembly included participation on several Select Standing Committees including Privileges and Elections, Law Amendments, Private Bills, Public Accounts, Printing and the Library. He chaired a number of these committees.

Dr. Hamilton was responsible for piloting the amendment to the Manitoba Medical College Act (which made the Medical College a part of the University of Manitoba) through the Assembly. He gave full support to the amendment to the Municipal Boundaries Act despite the fact that his own riding of Elmwood would be eliminated. That the Mothers' Allowance, Public School and Pharmaceutical Acts were given positive support in the Legislature was due, in part, to his persuasive and informed endorsement. It was also during a session of this Legislature that Dr. Hamilton expressed the opinion that, in the interests of public safety, annual re-licensing of all those connected with the health sciences should be mandatory.

The 15th Legislature was dissolved on March 27, 1920. As the riding of Elmwood had been eliminated and a portion of it was now part of Winnipeg, Dr. Hamilton, along with forty other candidates, sought one of the ten seats of the House now reserved for the city of Winnipeg. Although Dr. Hamilton made a strong showing, a heavy labour vote and his split riding proved too formidable. He was not re-elected.

These concerns, however, were secondary to his main calling--that of physician and surgeon. Although this collection does not emphasize his medical career, other records show that it was one of solid achievement. From 1911 to 1934, he was a member of the Winnipeg General Hospital Medical Staff. In 1919 the Board of Trustees of the Winnipeg General Hospital appointed him Assistant Surgeon (Outdoor) on the Honourary Attending Medical Staff of the hospital. All those who accepted such appointments incurred, as a condition of appointment, the responsibility to teach in connection with the medical school. Dr. Hamilton taught medical jurisprudence and acted also as examiner in Clinical Surgery.

The busy practitioners who formed the (Outdoor) Attending Medical Staff agreed to accept the further obligation of attending a Clinical Lunch on the first and third Thursdays of each month. One half hour was given over for lunch and a full hour devoted to clinical cases and discussion. The agenda of those luncheons show that Dr. Hamilton regularly addressed the group on surgical cases involving various forms of cancer, orthopaedic and skin graft problems. These talks, as well as published articles, indicate an uncommon measure of success in maintaining the mobility of injured points. The records of annual meetings of the Winnipeg General Hospital Board indicate his deep concern for a high level of service. His constant plea was for more effective co-operation between all levels of hospital personnel. These same records show him working shoulder to shoulder with men whose medical achievements were to gain them international recognition. It was a time that might well be called "the golden age" of the Winnipeg General Hospital when its Honourary Attending Staff included, not only Dr. Hamilton, but Dr. William Boyd (Pathology), Drs. Bruce and Gordon Chown (Rh Factor and Paediatrics), Drs. L.S. Goodman and A. Gilman (Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics) and Dr. Maxwell Wintrobe (Clinical Haematology).

Dr. Hamilton was an indefatigable worker. In 1921 he was elected President of the newly formed University of Manitoba Alumni Association and President of the Manitoba Medical Association. As well, he published the first edition of the Manitoba Medical Association Bulletin. In 1923 he was appointed one of Manitoba's two representatives to the Executive of the Canadian Medical Association--a position he held until 1931.

Considerable as these achievements were, it was his investigation of psychic phenomena that accounted for his international reputation. In 1918, his interest in the psychic had been aroused by his close friend Professor W.T. Allison (Professor of English at Wesley College), who had personally investigated the Patience Worth phenomena. Applying his usual scientific method of investigation, Dr. Hamilton familiarized himself with both the early and current literature of the subject. His later lectures and articles showed him to be thoroughly conversant with the work of Schrenk-Notzing, Geley, Osty, Myers, Podmore and Rhine. For a time his interest lay dormant. But, late in 1920, he began his own experiments which were to continue until April 1935. His aim was the investigation of paranormal phenomena (rappings, psychokinesis, ectoplasms and materializations) under scientific conditions that would rule out any possibility of fraud and minimize any possibility of error. Dr. Hamilton was particularly suited, both by training and by temperament, to conduct such investigations. While psychic phenomena have been known under one name or another in every recorded society, the questionable claims (some of which read like adventures in the absurd) of those who conducted their investigations under loose (if not fraudulent) experimental conditions, produced a scepticism on the part of many. There are few subjects which have aroused more bitter controversy. Dr. Hamilton, however, was interested in certain basic issues: 1) Do we have paranormal abilities, potentials for awareness and communication and action that we do not fully realize? 2) Can they be observed, measured and evaluated? 3) Are these abilities psychological or physical or both? 4) Do these capabilities continue to function after the experience of physical death? In other words, "Is there survival after death?"

Apparently, Dr. Hamilton was not primarily motivated by sentimental or religious beliefs. What he sought to obtain were verifiable facts culled from repeated experiments over a long period of time and conducted under rigorously controlled conditions. Full, accurate records of his experiments--many of them verbatim--were kept. An elaborate battery of cameras provided photographic records. He was well aware that many scientists refused to assign this subject a place for serious investigation. But, as one of his friends indicated, "He followed his own convictions, careless of criticism." In this, as in his other endeavours, he was interested in anything that might be beneficially applied to the human condition. Considering the present-day experimentation in extra-sensory perception, particularly in medical institutions, he may have been ahead of his time.

Nevertheless, there is no indication that his sincerity or integrity was ever in doubt. For himself, like Bagehot, he seems to have realized that "one of the greatest pains to human nature is the pain of a new idea." Knowing this, he was able to accept such criticism as did come his way with a certain equanimity. In time, Dr. Hamilton's work became known in the United Kingdom, in Europe and in the United States. He was asked to speak before a wide variety of groups. From 1926 to 1935, he gave eighty-six lectures and wrote numerous articles that were published in Canada and abroad.

In his correspondence and in his other writings, Dr. Hamilton created his own portrait more accurately than either his family or friends could possibly have done. His writing transmits a warmth of personality and friendship. It is the records of an uncommon man who counted among his friends, in both Europe and America, many famous personalities of the 1920s and 1930s.

In 1933 he resigned from his staff and teaching positions due to ill health, although he continued to write on topics of interest to him. His last article, "Reality of Psychic Force", appeared in Light, Vol. 55, No. 2828 on Thursday, January 10, 1935. He died of a heart attack on April 7, 1935 at the age of sixty-one. The many tributes received by his family attest to the high regard in which he was held both by his medical colleagues and by his other numerous acquaintances. His wife Lillian carried on his paranormal experimentations following his death.

CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT DATES

1873 -- Born November 27th to James and Isabella (Glendenning) Hamilton at Agincourt, Ontario

1903 -- Graduated from Manitoba Medical College

1904 -- Completed internship at Winnipeg General Hospital and commenced practice in Elmwood

1906 -- Married Lillian May Forrester, November 26th

1907 -- Elected to the Winnipeg Public School Board

1915 -- Served in the Manitoba Legislature

1920-1916 -- First Chairman of the Winnipeg Committee on Mothers' Pensions

1920 -- Fellow, American College of Surgeons

1921 -- President, University of Manitoba Alumni Association

1921-1922 -- President, Manitoba Medical Association; President, University of Manitoba Alumni Association; Member, American College of Surgeons

1923-1934 -- Manitoba representative on the executive of the Canadian Medical Association

1918-1934 -- Period of psychic research

1926-1934 -- Eighty-six public addresses given to diverse audiences in Canada, England and the United States

1930 -- August 27th, addressed the British Medical Association Convention in Winnipeg; topic: "Psychic Research"

1935 -- Last article, "Reality of Psychic Force", appeared in Light, vol. 55, no. 2818 (Thursday, January 10) Contracted influenza and suffered a heart attack Died April 7, 1935

McCracken, Melinda

  • mccracken_m
  • Personne
  • June 1, 1940 - May 17, 2002

Melinda McCracken was born on June 1st, 1940 in Winnipeg, Manitoba to William Frederick and Edith (nee Cochran). She has one brother, John. McCracken attended Riverview School from 1946-1955 and Churchill High School from which she graduated in 1957. McCracken then entered the University of Manitoba on a music scholarship and she received her B.A. in Honors English in 1961.

From 1961 to 1962, she worked on the women's pages of the Winnipeg Free Press. In 1962, McCracken went to Paris to study drawing and painting at the Bynam Shaw School. The following year, she took a silversmithing course at the Hornsey College of Art in London. During the two years that McCracken was in Paris and London she wrote a bi-weekly column for the Winnipeg Free Press. McCracken returned to Canada in 1964 and settled in Montreal. After trying her hand at making jewelry for a living, she relied on her writing skills to support herself. She began working at Weekend Magazine, a national supplement magazine, where she wrote captions and headlines, edited copy, and wrote an occasional feature story.

From 1967 to 1967, McCracken was a freelance writer. She wrote a weekly column for the Toronto Daily Star called "The Montreal Scene," wrote continuity for a CBC-TV public affairs program called The New Generation. She also wrote articles for The Montrealer, The Winnipeg Free Press, and The Star Weekly. In 1968, McCracken moved to Toronto and began working on the entertainment pages of The Globe and Mail. She was transferred to the copy desk of The Globe Magazine in 1969 where she wrote captions, headlines and edited stories. In 1971, McCracken was transferred back to the features department of The Globe and Mail, where she edited columns on the second front, the Parliament page, the Saturday international page, and did some work on the television page. In 1972, McCracken freelanced for Maclean's Magazine. She also wrote short stories for Chatelaine and Miss Chatelaine. As well, she wrote book reviews for The Globe and Mail book pages. One interview that garnered McCracken quite a bit of attention was her profile of Adrienne Clarkson in the September 1972 issue of Maclean's.

In 1973, McCracken gave birth to her daughter, Molly. McCracken was given an Ontario Arts Council grant to write a story about growing up in Winnipeg. The completed manuscript, Memories Are Made of This, was published by James Lorimer & Co. in 1975. Also in 1975, McCracken contributed to an anthology of Canadian women. She wrote chapters featuring painter Edith Warkov and McCracken's mother, Edith. The anthology, Her Own Woman, was published by Macmillan. McCracken also contributed a chapter on architect Etienne Gaboury in the anthology, Winnipeg 8: The Icecold Hothouse, published by Queenston House in 1983. McCracken spent the years from 1973 to 1984 as a freelance writer. She moved to Winnipeg in 1976. From 1981 to 1985, McCracken worked as a salesclerk at Classics Books in Winnipeg. In 1984, McCracken returned to school, and completed the Red River Community College Library Technician course. After graduation, from 1985 to 1989, she worked as a Information Writer at Manitoba Energy and Mines. From 1989 to 1991, McCracken was employed as a Library Technician for the St. Boniface School Division.

From 1991-2002, McCracken was a freelance writer/researcher. She was the Writer-in-Residence in Carman in 1996. McCracken was also involved in many literary organizations including: The Writers' Union of Canada- The Status of Women Writers Committee; Re:Visions Women's Film and Video Festival; St. Norbert Arts and Cultural Centre; Payment for Public Use/Book Committee; Manitoba Arts Council; Manitoba Writers' Guild; Manitoba Film Board; Women and Words; and The Canada Council. McCracken's articles appeared in many Canadian magazines. She also worked as the Manitoba contributing editor to the NeWest Review. She passed away on May 17, 2002.

Pitblado Family

  • pitfamily
  • Personne
  • 1836-1977

The Manitoba Pitblado family formed one branch of an extensive North American family of Scottish origin. The immediate forebears came from Fife and settled in Nova Scotia. One of these, Charles Bruce Pitblado (1836-1913), became a Presbyterian minister and, following a tour of the Canadian West, accepted a call in 1881 to the newly-organized St. Andrew's Church in Winnipeg. In 1885, he served as a chaplain with the Canadian forces fighting against Louis Riel. Pitblado accompanied the captured Riel to Regina. In 1893, he became the first pastor of Westminster Church.

Isaac Pitblado (1867-1964), the son of Charles Bruce Pitblado, had a long and distinguished legal career. An early graduate of the University of Manitoba, he served as Chairman of the Board of Governors from 1917 to 1924 and, in 1935, served as President of the Canadian Bar Association. He enjoyed lacrosse, curling, and duck-hunting.

Edward Bruce Pitblado (1896-1977), Isaac's only son, followed his father as a lawyer and sportsman. He served in both World Wars, was a Rhodes Scholar, played for the 1924 British Olympic hockey team, and served as Secretary of Ducks Unlimited from 1938 to 1974.

Murta, Jack Burnett

  • murta_j
  • Personne
  • 1943-

Jack Burnett Murta was born May 13, 1943 in Carman, Manitoba, the son of John James Murta and Jean (Burnett) Murta. He received his elementary and high school education in Graysville, a hamlet near the family farm, and graduated from the Diploma course in Agriculture at the University of Manitoba in 1964. He married Ida Judith Scott on October 23, 1965 and they had two children together, Scott Burnett and Tracy Judith. They divorced in 1977. Murta married Lynda E. (Morris) Grayson-Bell on May 27, 1977. They had three children together, Meaghan, Shevaughn and Liam.

Murta was first elected to the House of Commons, as a Progressive Conservative, for Lisgar riding on November 16, 1970 in a by-election following the death of the previous incumbent, George Muir. Murta was re-elected in the general elections of 1972, 1974, 1979, 1980, and 1984.

Before the formation of the Conservative government in 1979, Murta served as opposition critic for agriculture, then transportation, air transportation, and international trade. Under Prime Minister Joe Clark he became Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board and chaired the Emergency Grain Movement Task Force. During this period he became active in the Canada-United States Interparliamentary Group especially in its Committee on wheat. Back in opposition, Murta was named in 1981 to the Sub-Committee on Latin America and the Caribbean, and in 1982 to the Board of Directors of the Parliamentary Centre for Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade. Under Prime Minister Brian Mulroney he was sworn in as a Privy Councillor with his appointment as Minister of State for Multiculturalism (September 1984-August 1985). Subsequently he served as Minister of State (Tourism) (August 1985-June 1986).

Park, Kip

  • park_k
  • Personne
  • 1939-

Christopher “Kip” Park was born 31 July 1939, and died at the age of 59 years on 20 June 1999. Born to Eleanor and Halsey Park, he had a brother, Michael, and lived in Winnipeg for much of his life. In 1972, he married Sylvia Mouflier. Together, Park and his wife shared common interests in the environment and worked side-by-side as communication specialists. His interests in film production and art culminated in receiving an international award for first place in the American Association for Conservation Information (1971), an award of merit from the Art Directors Club of Toronto (1973-74) and completing a Bachelor of Fine Arts (1985).

He graduated from the University of Manitoba, first in 1968 with a Bachelor of Arts (honours) with majors in Urban Sociology and Urban Planning, then in 1985 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (ceramics). In addition to obtaining two Bachelor degrees, Park also received a certificate in Television Studio Production from Ryerson Polytechnical Institute Extension Department in 1968.

While attending the University of Manitoba in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Park was a member of the Glee Club and served on the University of Manitoba Students’ Union (UMSU). He received three awards in recognition of service as a Glee Club member in 1958 and 1960, and as Glee Club chairman in 1959. For his meritorious service to The Manitoban , Park was inducted into the “Ancient and Honourable Order of The Rubber Type with Coffee Bean Cluster” for both 1958-59 and 1959-60. In addition, he also served as the Public Relations Chairman for the university’s students’ union in 1962.

During his academic years, Park worked for both The Winnipeg Tribune and the university’s campus newspaper, The Manitoban. In 1959, Park began as a news reporter for The Manitoban. In the following year he was promoted to Executive Editor. He maintained this position for the 1960-61 school year, and afterwards, he wrote sporadic articles for the paper. At The Winnipeg Tribune, Park worked as the University of Manitoba campus correspondent, writing numerous articles between 1960 to approximately 1978.

In 1965, Park left on his second overseas trip. While in Europe, he traveled to several countries including Scotland (1966), England, and Greece (1967) as well as visiting Japan in 1968. In addition to his travels, Park worked in London, England and Kerkyra-Corfu Islands, Greece. During his time abroad, he documented various cultural and historical landmarks in his slide collection. After living in Europe for two years, he returned home to Winnipeg in 1967.

At this time, Park began his career in radio and television obtaining employment as a producer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, where he remained until 1969. He then accepted a position with Manitoba Department of Mines, Resources and Environmental Management as head and senior conservation education officer of the Public Education sector. In 1973, Park moved to Ottawa, Canada to become the manager of media relations for the Metric Commission of Canada. He continued to gain experience in the radio and television industry, coordinating national media campaigns to introduce Canadians to the new metric system. As well, he carried on researching, writing and editing numerous publications and reports for the Metric Commission of Canada. Park remained in Ottawa until 1976, when he returned to Winnipeg as a freelance journalist.

Aside from working as a journalist, Park was also a full-time writer and photographer. In addition to writing numerous articles, he wrote two unpublished manuscripts, one about the history of Winnipeg, and the other, an untitled novel. His photograph collections span the artistic to the professional fields, some of which have graced the covers of Canadian and American magazines, and many have been used to illustrate his articles. One of his more notable collections includes the photographs of the historical architectural buildings in Winnipeg. Although a number of photographs have been deposited at the Archives & Special Collections at the University of Manitoba Libraries, a series is also housed at the Western Canadian Pictorial Index in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

From 1976 until shortly before his death in 1999, Park wrote copious articles on housing, construction and energy technologies as well as Winnipeg heritage. His articles have appeared in a variety of national and international magazines such as Transportation Business, Heavy Construction News, Cottage Life, Harrowsmith and Fine Homebuilding. Additionally, some of his articles have been carried in national publications, such as his article “Sick-building Syndrome” which appeared in The Financial Post (30 November 1987). His main interest, however, was researching and writing publications and feature articles highlighting the historical and architectural significance of Winnipeg (and Manitoba) heritage buildings and districts.

During this time period, he became a regular contributor to The Winnipeg Real Estate News (1982-1999) and The Manitoba Co-Operator . In addition, he worked from approximately 1982 to 1988 as the editor for The Home Report, a monthly publication of the Manitoba Home Builders’ Association. In researching and writing many of his articles, Park collected various newspaper and magazine clippings, and company/product brochures as source material which otherwise was unavailable. This resulted in a series of research files focusing on topics such as Winnipeg and Manitoba businesses, local economy, industry and technology, environmental issues as well as information on Manitoba heritage. As a result of his extensive research, his articles have covered many diverse topics for the home renovator and the local historian.

In 1984, he researched and wrote The Historic Winnipeg Restoration Area – An Illustrated Guide to Winnipeg’s Historic Warehouse District for Heritage Winnipeg. In the same year, he also wrote an 80th anniversary history for The Winnipeg Construction Association. Park also researched and wrote the 50th anniversary history of the Manitoba Home Builders’ Association in 1988. In 1994, he prepared a history of the St. Vital area, including a walking tour guide for the St. Vital Historical Society. He continued to work with Heritage Winnipeg to review and update the heritage resources of the city. This lead to other projects, and in 1988, together with Heritage Winnipeg and the South Osborne Historical Society, he introduced younger generations to a realm of Winnipeg’s past and heritage.

In 1976, Park, along with his wife Sylvia Mouflier, formed Write Works Inc., a home business. As communication specialists, they specialized in translating complex technical terms and concepts into readable and readily understood language for articles, newspapers, brochures, pamphlets and booklets. Together, they wrote, illustrated and produced product literature for Manitoba companies, as well as advising corporations and other clients on communications strategies. With hands-on experience in residential construction, including an understanding of the technical aspects and requirements of modern-day housing, they designed and produced brochures, news releases and promotional write-ups for ditech, Welclad and Kraft Construction.

Park’s “hands-on” experience in housing construction was gained when he rebuilt his cabin at Shoal Lake. His enthusiasm for the environmental conservation and energy efficient housing resulted in his ability to design his cabin using solar energy and environmentally consciousness technology. As a result, articles on the cabin have appeared in several magazines including Cottage Life.

During his professional career, Park was a member of the Winnipeg Free Press Club and participated in the Beer & Skits nights. He was invited to several media and press releases, such as the opening of the Imax Theatre and the construction of the new building at 400 St. Mary’s Avenue. The fonds, thus, contains pamphlets and other textual material acquired from media events.

Aside from Park’s journalists career, he enjoyed various aspects of the Arts. During his visit to Greece, he was introduced to the field of pottery making, and in due course, formalized his training in the Fine Arts programme at the University of Manitoba in the 1980s. Many pieces of Park’s pottery currently grace the homes of friends and family. Park was also strongly interested in drawing and photography. Part of the Kip Park fonds contains black and white photographs from his photography course and of his cabin at Shoal Lake. Like his pottery, his line drawings have also been presented to a number of his friends and family. As well, the fonds contains a sample of his line drawings along with other artwork. In addition, Park and his wife, Sylvia, enjoyed the ballet for several years, and were season ticket holders for opening night performances.

Kip Park described himself as a creative and imaginative writer, photographer and editor with nearly forty years experience in print, electronic and visual media. His achievements in film and print attest to his interest in heritage and his concern for environmental issues. His collection of papers will benefit future research in Winnipeg’s architectural heritage.

Pentland, H. Clare

  • pentland_hc
  • Personne
  • 1914-1981

(abbreviated from the "Introduction" to Paul Phillips' edition of Pentland's Labour and Capital in Canada 1650-1860 )

Clare Pentland was born October 17, 1914, on a farm near Justice, Manitoba, a town some ten miles north-east of Brandon. His father was a farmer, later a trucker, his mother a school teacher. The Pentland family, however, were not recent immigrants to Canada. Clare's great-great-grandfather, an Ulster-Scot hand-loom weaver, emigrated to Canada from County Down, Ireland in 1821, settling first at Amherst Island, near Kingston, Ontario, where he practiced the dual vocations of farmer and weaver. His son, John, continued the agrarian-artisan tradition, becoming a carpenter . . . In 1843, the family moved to homestead in the Huron Tract, eight miles north of Goderich.

John's son (Clare's grandfather), Thomas, continued the westward move to the frontier, homesteading near Justice in 1881 where he combined farming with blacksmithing. This was the limit of the westward movement. The Pentland family became well established in the Elton municipality around Justice, and a Pentland has been reeve of the area for a good part of its political history. It was there that Clare's father grain-farmed and began his trucking business. While Clare was still a child, his family moved to Brandon to develop the business, largely in shipping cattle to the packers.

Clare grew up in Brandon, graduating from the Collegiate in 1931 and the Brandon Normal School in 1933. This was followed by three years of teaching in small country school houses at Whirlpool, a soldier settlement area near Clear. Lake, and at Ericson . . . He returned to university in 1936 and four years later, in 1940, graduated with a B.A. in Economics from Brandon College. . . While he attended university, he worked as an attendant at the Brandon Mental Hospital . . . It was also at the hospital that he met a young nurse Harriet Brook, who was later to become his wife. The following summer found him working as a brakeman on the CPR running between Brandon and Broadview. . .

The outbreak of war did not immediately interrupt Pentland's renewed educational program. From 1940 to 1942, he attended the University of Oregon where he obtained his Master's . . .

Almost immediately after completing his thesis in the early summer of 1942, Pentland enlisted in the Army and while undergoing training in British Columbia married Harriet in the fall of 1942 in Vancouver. After officer training near Victoria and artillery training at Brandon and Brockville, he went overseas in February of 1944 where he was transferred to the infantry as an education officer. He returned to Canada and to university, this time in Toronto, in the spring of 1946, under the Veterans Assistance Program and by 1948 completed all the requirements but the thesis for his Ph.D.. . He lectured briefly at Toronto, from 1947-1949, before returning to his native province as Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Manitoba in 1949. He remained at Manitoba for the remainder of his career. . . Finally. . the thesis was presented and defended late in 1960 and the degree conferred in 1961 . . .

In 1962-63, Pentland spent a sabbatical in Cambridge, England. Again in 1969-1970, he spent a sabbatical in England, this time at the University of Sussex working on parish population studies. Unfortunately, failing health prevented him from completing this work and further refining and developing the ideas introduced in his 1965 paper to the Third International Conference on Economic History in Munich.

Despite his pursuit of historical demography in the 1960's Pentland was also able to research and write his second major and influential unpublished manuscript, "A Study of the Changing Social, Economic, and Political Background of the Canadian System of Industrial Relations", commissioned by the federally-appointed Task Force on Labour Relations . . .
The 1960's were intensely productive years for Pentland. In addition to his population research and Task Force report, he also pursued his interest in technological change, producing three major reports for both provincial and federal agencies on skills, training and technological change plus a number of lesser reviews on related issues.

Unfortunately, this level of intellectual activity could not be maintained. Heart problems plagued the last ten years of his life, robbing him of his stamina, a terrible frustration for a man so dedicated to his teaching and his work. Yet despite this he shouldered a heavy administrative load in university affairs, as a member of Senate from 1963 to 1966 and again from 1969 to 1976, and as a member of the Board of Governors representing the Senate from 1973 to 1976. He also served on numerous university and Faculty Association committees as well as continuing to teach, write and research. Two articles (published posthumously) and two reviews were the primary academic output of the 1970's before his premature death on October 13, 1978.

Chronology of Important Dates
1914 Harry Clare Pentland born October 17 to Mr. and Mrs. H.M. Pentland, near Justice, Manitoba
1931 Graduated from Brandon Collegiate Institute
1933 Graduated from Brandon Normal School 1933-36 Taught in rural Manitoba
1940 B.A., Brandon College, University of Manitoba
1942 M.A., University of Oregon; married Harriet Brook by whom he had three sons: David, Don, John
1942-46 Canadian Army
1946-49 Doctoral studies and teaching, University of Toronto
1949-78 Dept. of Economics, University of Manitoba
1961 Ph.D., University of Toronto
1961-62 "A Study of Labour Skills in Reference to Manitoba's Economic Future" for the Committee on Manitoba's Economic Future. Unpublished.
1962-63 Sabbatical leave, University of Cambridge
1963-65 President, Manitoba Historical Society
1965 "Population and Labour Supply in Britain in the Eighteen Century": paper presented to the third International Conference of Economic History, Munich
1965 "Implication of Automation for the Employment and Training of White Collar Workers in Manitoba", for the Manitoba Economic Consultative Board. Unpublished
1967-68 "A Study of the Changing Social, Economic and Political Background of the Canadian System of Industrial Relations", for the Task Force on Labour Relations. Unpublished
1968-69 "Human Adjustment to Technological Change: The Case of the Manitoba Rolling Mills.:`, for the Dept. of Manpower and Immigration. Unpublished
1969-70 Sabbatical leave, University of Sussex
1978 Died 13 October, at Winnipeg
1981 Labour and Capital in Canada 1650-1860: published version of doctoral thesis

Peto Family

  • peto_family
  • Famille
  • 1918-2017

Leonard Donnelly Peto was born on July 19, 1918, in Virden, Manitoba, to Walter and Kate Peto. Leonard received a BA from the University of Winnipeg and a Bachelors in Education from the University of Manitoba. He married Pauline Patricia Peto (Martin) in 1947 and had 2 children: Leona (Murray) Brown and Joan (Dr. Fraser) Linklater. Soon after graduating university, Leonard began to teach in schools. In 1953 he contracted polio and had to put his career on hold for a year and a half. Once he recovered, he continued to teach in a wheelchair at River Heights Junior High for 23 years as Head of the English Department and science teacher. In 1983 he had to return to the King George Hospital (Riverview Health Centre) due to deteriorated lungs. With the aid of a respirator, he continued to voluntarily teach throughout the community. Leonard’s achievements were recognized in 1998 when he received the Governor Generals Award as a “Caring Canadian”; in 1953 when he received an award from the Independent Living Resource Centre; and when the United Nations “Year of the Family” chose the Peto family as the Manitoban “Family of the Year”. Leonard was a member of the Mentors Club, President of the Toastmasters Group, honourary member of the Princess Elizabeth Guild, member of the Post Polio Club, on the board of Riverview Health Centre, and worshipped at St. Aidan’s Anglican Church for over 50 years. Leonard is known for his sense of humour, patience, kindness, even temper, source of inspiration to students, and his strong religious beliefs. Leonard passed away on March 24, 2001.

Pauline Patricia Peto (Martin) was born on March 13, 1918, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to Francis (Frank) Martin and Clara Belle Powley. After high school, Pauline graduated from the University of Manitoba’s Faculty of Home Economics in 1939 and Faculty of Education in 1940. She began her career in British Columbia teaching sewing, however moved back to Winnipeg shortly thereafter. Pauline married Leonard Donnelly Peto in 1947 and had 2 daughters: Leona (Murray) Brown and Joan (Dr. Fraser) Linklater. She overcame the challenges that came when her husband contracted polio in 1953, that had lasted for a year and half, whilst raising her family and continuing her career. Pauline was a member of the St. Aidan’s Anglican Church for over 50 years, an active member of the Women’s Auxiliary, Dorcus Group, and University Women’s Club. Pauline is known for her strength of character, unwavering love for her family, enduring Christian faith, and intense love for Winnipeg. Pauline passed away on February 24 2017.

Vanstone, Russenholt, MacFarlane Family

  • vrm_family
  • Famille
  • 1908-2015

Kathleen Josephine Vanstone Russenholt was born on July 9, 1908, in Wawanesa, Manitoba, to Charles M. Vanstone and Lily J. Clarke. In 1929 Kathleen (also known as Kay) graduated from the University of Manitoba with a BSc. After graduation, Kay was a supervisor of Canadian Chautauquas, a provincial secretary of the Wartime Information Board, and a broadcaster; during this time Kay was a host of the “Man About the House” radio program on CBC Winnipeg. At some time, Kay married Edgar S. Russenholt (also known as Ed) and had 3 children: Lynne MacFarlane (Russenholt), Ben Russenholt, and Champ (Fayre) Russenholt. After her marriage, Kay served as President of the Science Alumni Association at the University of Manitoba, served two terms as the alumni representative on the University Board of Governors, was on the planning committee of the Women’s School of Citizenship, President of the Winnipeg chapter of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs, an executive member of the University Women’s Club, a member of the local United Nations Association, served on the national board for the Canadian Institute of Adult Education, a member of the Manitoba Liquor Licensing Board, and was a Manitoba member of the Federal Centennial Commission. For her achievements, Kay was named “Woman of the Year” by the Winnipeg Tribune in 1952. Kay passed away on May 11, 1989.

Lynne MacFarlane (Russenholt) was born on July 29, 1932, to her parents, Edgar S. Russenholt and Kathleen Josephine Vanstone Russenholt. She attended Laura Secord School, Wolseley School, and Gordon Bell High School, during this time she was involved in almost every activity and club the schools offered. When she graduated, she attended the University of Manitoba and completed an Honour’s Degree in History and Political Science; she was a member of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority (Lynne appears in both the 1952 and 1953 University yearbooks). Years later she would return to receive her Master’s degree in History where she performed extensive research on Rosa Luxemburg. In 1950 she met her future husband, Donald MacFarlane and eventually had four children: Shannon (Rob Giesbrecht), Avon, Tara, and Scott (Donna). Her career path varied greatly throughout the years with positions such as: broadcaster, journalist, public relations professional, writer, best-selling author, stock broker, financial planner, speaker, counsellor, and editor for the Manitoban; and she had worked for CBC, the Winnipeg Tribune, the University of Manitoba, RBC Dominion Securities, and a business partner with her husband at MacFarlane Communications Services Ltd. She also spent a term sitting on the Canadian Advisory Council on the Status of Women and was involved with the Panhellenic movement. Lynne was generous with her time and knowledge, as she would aid friends and family in time of need, as she aided Marjorie Gillies manage her financial affairs; and when she would keep all of her family members in contact with one another. She is known for her strong work ethic, fierce intellect, kindness, generosity, support systems, vibrant personality, force of good, pride in Canadian heritage, and a role model to many. Lynne passed away of Alzheimer’s on October 30, 2015.

Glenlea Research Station

  • glenlears
  • Collectivité
  • 1966-

In June 1966, Premier Duff Roblin on behalf of the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics officially opened the Centre for Applied Research at Glenlea. The Centre began to be commonly referred to as the Glenlea Research Station the same year. The area consists of nine river lots which, when purchased in 1962, had comprised three separate farms. The Station is located on Highway 75, approximately 20 km south of the University of Manitoba Fort Garry campus. There are approximately 500 hectares of land partitioned into three main areas by Highway 75 and the railway line. West of Highway 75 is an area of approximately 400 hectares which is divided into 14 fields. The Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences operate the Station with financial support from Manitoba Agriculture and the University of Manitoba.

The Station originally housed the Dairy Science Centre, a beef Nutrition Unit, a Swine Research Centre, and a research program involving field-scale crop rotation. Today there are facilities for other departments at the University of Manitoba including the Avian Behaviour Laboratory for ducks and geese, under the direction of the Department of Psychology, an observatory operated by the Department of Mathematics and Astronomy and a geomagnetic observatory supervised by the Department of Geology. In addition, the Station had been an official meteorological recording site, providing weather information to Environment Canada. Finally, the Manitoba Wildlife Rehabilitation Organization had operated the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center on site.

Shipley, Nan

  • shipley_n
  • Personne
  • 1902-1990

Nancy Evelyn Shipley (nee Somerville) was born in Glasgow, Scotland on November 6, 1902. In the 1920s, she moved to Winnipeg and married George Shipley. Nan Shipley published fourteen books and numerous short stories and articles. Her first book Anna and the Indians (1955) had been reprinted many times. Among her better known publications are Frances and the Crees (1957); The Railway Builders (1965); The James Evan Story (1966); and Churchill: Canada’s Northern Gateway (1974). As a big supporter of Indigenous and Métis culture, she organized Manitoba’s first Indigenous handicrafts sales centre (1959) and focused her writing on Indigenous and Métis women. In 1965 Shipley was elected Woman of the Year by the Women’s Advertising and Sales Club of Winnipeg. She also hosted weekly television program (1974-75) at CKND Winnipeg. Nan Shipley passed away on January 23, 1990.

1904 - Born in Glasgow, Scotland, daughter of Robert Somerville and Mary (MacDonald) Somerville.
1925 - Married George Shipley.
1955 - First book published by Ryerson Press Book "Anna and the Indians"
1960-61 - Radio and television series on Western Canadian Indigenous peoples culture given.
1965 - Woman of the Year in Manitoba award.
1966 - Good Citizen and Golden Boy Awards received.
1966-67 - Instructor at University of Manitoba Evening Institute.
1970 - Received North Dakota State University award for Historical Writing.
1970 - Presented a brief to Status of Women Commission on Women of First Nations and Métis ancestry.
1972 - With Alex Grisdale, published "Wild Drums."
1974 - Published "Churchill: Canada's Northern Gateway:'(her 13th book) which received the Margaret McWilliams Medal.
1978 -  Reader's Digest published condensed form of "Return to the River."
1979 - Paper given at University of Manitoba Annual Archives Symposium.
1981 - Anonymous donor established two Nan Shipley Scholarships.
1982 - Published "The International Peace Garden. 50th Anniversary." Peguis Press.

Stadelmeir, Adolf Leonard

  • stadelmeir_a
  • Personne
  • 1911-?

Adolf Leonard Stadelmeir was born on November 14, 1911. After his marriage to Julia Stadelmeir (nee Rudawski), they had a daughter, Louise, circa 1938. In September of 1939, Adolf enlisted in the Canadian Army and was assigned to the 12th Field Coy (company) of the Royal Canadian Engineers (RCE). He was posted to England in early 1940, was acting Company Quarter Master Sergeant (CQMS) by the fall of 1940, and later full CQMS with the No. 2 Tunneling Coy of the RCE. He served with this company at Gibraltar from March 1941 to December 1942. After returning to England, Adolf disappeared under disputed circumstances. His wife, Julia Stadelmeir, consistently attempted to locate Adolf until at least 1988. His whereabouts and fate are still unknown, although Julia Stadelmeir’s obituary indicated, perhaps speculatively, that he predeceased her.

Nep, Gail

  • nep_g
  • Personne
  • 194-? -

Gail Nep was born and raised in Winnipeg, MB. After graduating from Grant Park High School, Nep attended the University of Manitoba graduating with a degree in Education in 1966, followed by a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1971. After completing university, in 1972 Nep began teaching as an Art Teacher within the Seven Oaks School Division until retiring in 2000. In 1979, she began her own art consultation service, which she continues to operate today, working with corporate and government collections, as well as private collectors, analyzing the current value, condition and future of collections. Nep further immersed herself in the art community throughout the 1980s and 1990s, working as the Curator for the University of Manitoba Faculty Club and joining the Board of Directors for the Manitoba Craft Council from 1984-1989 and 1992-1994. From 1985 until 1992, Nep owned and operated Uptown Gallery, which focused heavily on curating and selling contemporary Canadian artists such as, Wanda Koop, Bruce Head, Jordan Van Sewell and William Pura.

Ross, Ian

  • ross_i
  • Personne
  • 1968-

Ian Ross was born in McCreary, Manitoba in 1968 and currently resides in Winnipeg. He is a Métis Canadian playwright. Ross attended the University of Manitoba where he studied film and theatre and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1992. Ross's directing experience includes short films and plays for student productions as well as for the Winnipeg Fringe Festival and the Red Roots Theatre. His writing and performing have been described as provocative and enthralling offering a distinct and accurate perspective on the experiences of Indigenous people. In 1996 Ross received the John Hirsch Award for Most Promising Manitoba Writer and in 1997 Ross's play fareWel won the Governor General's Award for English Drama and was published by Scirocco Drama Publishing the same year. Ross's plays include fareWel, The Gap, Heart of a Distant Tribe, Baloney!, Bic Off!, Bereav'd of Light, and An Illustrated History of the Anishnabe. Ross's plays have been produced by the Manitoba Association of Playwrights-Short Shots, Prairie Theatre Exchange, Manitoba Theatre for Young People, the Black Hole Theatre, the Winnipeg Fringe Festival, and the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Ross has also conducted numerous workshops and classes with various Winnipeg schools on playwriting. Beginning in 1997, Ross wrote and performed "Joe from Winnipeg" on CBC Radio and Television. The popular "Joe from Winnipeg" episodes were subsequently published in two books, The Book of Joe and Joe from Winnipeg .

Thornton, Elizabeth

  • thornton_e
  • Personne
  • 1940-2010

Mary George (pen name Elizabeth Thornton) was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, and taught school there for several years. In 1969, she emigrated to Canada with her family. She taught elementary school in Winnipeg until 1977, when she resigned to take a position as a lay minister with the Presbyterian church. In 1980, she enrolled in evening classes at the University of Winnipeg and received a B.A. in Classics in 1985. Her first romance novel was published in 1987 and, in 1989, she became a full-time writer. She published 27 romances and 2 novellas and received a number of romance writing awards.

Turnbull, David

  • turnbull_d
  • Personne
  • 1906-1995

David McIntosh Turnbull was born in Winnipeg, Canada in 1906. He was the son of Janet (McIntosh) and William Turnbull, a graduate of the school of Medicine at the University of Manitoba in 1904.

David attended the University of Manitoba from 1924 to 1928 where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics. In his final year he was the senior stick for the Faculty of Arts and was awarded the Manitoba Rhodes Scholarship to attend Oxford. At Oxford he obtained a Bachelor and Masters of Arts in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1931. During his time at Oxford University he was accepted as a member of the University Ice Hockey Team in 1928 and played for the team at the Spengler Cup in 1928 and 1929.

Turnbull returned to Winnipeg, but in 1931 relocated to Toronto where prospects were believed to be better. That year he joined Manufacturers Life, but two years later he was hired by the firm Woods, Gordon and Co. as a "time-study man". Employed within the firm’s work measurement services department, Turnbull was primarily concerned with time and motion, marketing, supervisory training and organizational studies. In 1952, he opened the firm’s Montreal office where he remained in charge for the next twelve years. Upon his mandatory retirement as a partner in 1964, he moved to the Toronto office to assist the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine in its expansion project. He fully retired in 1972 and pursued his own interests until his death on December 26th, 1995.

Turner, D. Harold

  • turner_dh
  • Personne

Born and educated in Winnipeg, D. Harold Turner taught speech, drama and children's literature in the Faculty of Education at the University of Manitoba. He was active in the Manitoba Festival of Arts as a committee chairman and adjudicator and in the Manitoba Historical Society and Drama League. He received the Centennial Medal for his contribution to drama in the Manitoba community. It was for his contribution to children's literature that D. Harold Turner will be remembered. His first publication, To Hang A Rebel , was a Children's Book Centre choice in 1978. He later published Quips and Cranks of George Ashton (1978) and Atomic Archers: Target Terror (1983).

Spettigue, Douglas Odell

  • spettigue_d
  • Personne
  • 1930-

Douglas O. Spettigue, Professor of English at Queen's University, is well known for his literary research into the life and writings of Frederick Philip Grove. He is widely credited for the discovery of Grove's earlier German identity, Felix Paul Greve. Grove had already contributed notably to the literature of his own country with poetry, at least two novels, and voluminous translations and criticisms before he began a new life and writing career in Canada. Besides his work on Grove, Spettigue has written several short stories.

Sykes, Eileen

  • sykes_e
  • Personne
  • 1908-2002

Eileen Sykes was raised on a farm in La Vallee, Ontario, but spent most of her adult life in Winnipeg. Her farm childhood is credited as the source of her fantasies of forest animals and the world of nature. Her imagination, when coupled with her literary abilities, led her to publish several short but fairly popular books of children's literature including The Gay Garland (1954) and Fanella and the Forest Folk (1978). She also wrote short stories and poetry and was a member of the Manitoba Writers Guild and the Canadian Authors Association. In 2000, the Eileen McTavish Sykes award for Best First Book by a Manitoba Writer was established by the Manitoba Writers Guild.

Eileen Sykes passed away in 2002.

Public Markets Ltd.

  • publicmarkets
  • Collectivité
  • 1911-1990

Public Markets Limited (PML) was incorporated In 1911 by the Manitoba Government in order to provide Manitoba livestock producers with a market-place to accommodate this growing industry. A 137-acre [or 232- acre] site located on Marion Street in St. Boniface was purchased by the City of Winnipeg. In the land title reocords, this areas was referred to as the ‘Roman Catholic Mission Property’. On August 14, 1913, the Marion Street facility, with its stock yards and packing house facility, was officially opened by Premier Sir Rodmond Roblin. For the next seventy-five years, this facility, known as the Union Stock Yards, not only provided the City of St. Boniface with its largest single source of employers but became a vital cog in Manitoba's agricultural economy.

According to the Manitoba Historical Society, "An agreement was made with three main railroads, the Canadian Northern Railway (CNR), Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), and Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTP), all of whom wanted service access to the sites... [The] PML was financed with a capital stock of $1.5 million and 10,000 shares of $100. Each railroad company was allotted 3,333 shares and one directorship in the PML. The railroads retained collective ownership of PML while the public was guaranteed a voice, and ability to affect prices, with several provincially-appointed directors to represent local producers and the public interest."

The livestock business in Manitoba owes its origins to the great cattle drives in the Southwestern United States. The Dodge City/Western Trail led up into Alberta where it hooked up with the newly completed Canadian National Railway. Cattle were loaded on to freight cars and shipped to the markets in Eastern Canada. Along the way the trains stopped off in Winnipeg to water and feed the cattle, giving rise to Manitoba's livestock industry. Winnipeg's first stock yard was located in the Weston area but space constraints and easier access to the rail lines necessitated the move to St. Boniface. The Union Stock Yards were the largest of their kind in Canada. The yard had its own private well essential in providing the endless stream of water required.

In 1925, Canada Packers opened a meat processing plant next to the yard, thirteen years later they were joined by Swift. World War II brought unprecedented growth to the packing industry as Canada supplied meat for the troops overseas. The yards represented a large cross-section of livestock interests. Within its structure were numerous salesmen, buyers, producers and employees of the trade and yard company. The Canada Department of Agriculture also provided two essential services. Veterinarians performed health inspections and a daily market report was prepared to inform the industry on livestock values and prices. Truck and brand inspections were carried out by representatives of the provincial governments. The market had its own Livestock Exchange to supervise trading and its membership included buyers for all kinds of stock as well as bonded commission firms and dealers.

The livestock received and sold at Union Stock Yards came from all three prairie provinces, destined for the local market, Eastern Canada, or under favourable exchange and trading conditions, the United States. The principal requirement locally was to provide slaughter cattle for the processing plants. However, under good weather and feed conditions there was a significant turnover of cattle back into the Manitoba feed lots for finishing. The Eastern Canada market was constant year-round with upwards of 300,000 cattle and calves shipped annually. The yard was also the largest exporter of feeder cattle in Canada with steady sales to Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska.

Failure to keep up with technological advancements and the advent of refrigerated trucks conspired to end the Union Stock Yards dominance of the industry. Trucks took over as the principal means of beef shipping with the completion of the Trans Canada Highway in 1955. The meat packing industry began to move closer to the source of its product as plants in Alberta supplanted Winnipeg processors. Manitoba hog processing still remains a viable industry but the Union Stock Yards, Canada Packers and Swift beef processing plants had outlived their usefulness by 1990. The Swift plant was demolished in 1994.

Stobie Family

  • stobie_family
  • Famille
  • 1909-2007

William Stobie was born June 1st, 1911 in London, England. He obtained a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Toronto and briefly did graduate work at the University of Illinois before returning to the University of Toronto to continue course work for a Ph.D. in English. In 1938, William married Margaret Roseborough, also a Ph.D. in English. That year he obtained an appointment to the faculty of De Pauw University in Greencastle, Indiania. The couple next moved to Missouri where William taught at the University of Missouri and Margaret taught at the Christian College for women. In 1944 they embarked on a two-year stint at Cornell University. In 1946 both Margaret and William joined the English Department of the University of Manitoba as assistant professors. William's area of expertise was Nineteenth-Century English writers. He participated in a lecture for University on Air in 1947 on the poet Frank Scott. William was the President of the Winnipeg Little Theatre Group in 1955-1958. William was active in the University unions and was President of the staff association of UMSU during the Harry Crowe affair. William sat on several university committees including the University College Building Committee. He attained the rank of Associate Professor in 1954 and full professor in 1967. He was the director of Summer and Evening session from 1965-1976. William Stobie retired in 1976 after 30 years with the English Department. William Stobie died in 2007.

Dr. Margaret (Peg) Roseborough was born in Vermillion, Alberta on February 26th, 1909. She received her B.A. from the University of Alberta in 1930. Margaret was awarded an IODE Overseas Fellowship and did an Honours Degree in English at King's College University of London in 1932. She returned to Canada completing an M.A. in 1934, and a Ph.D. in 1937, at the University of Toronto. The following year she published An Outline of Middle English Grammar with MacMillan's, and taught at Victoria College. In 1938, she married William Stobie. The couple moved to DePauw University in Indiana in 1938. From there, they moved to Missouri where Margaret returned to teaching at Christian College a Women's Institution. William and Margaret Stobie taught at Cornell University for two years from 1944-1946 before joining the English department at the University of Manitoba. Margaret was forced to retire from teaching with the inception of the nepotism law in 1950. She spent the next several years acting, producing and directing local theatre as well as working for the CBC in various dramatic roles and as a book reviewer on Critically Speaking. In 1958 she took an appointment at United College, but resigned in protest over the dismissal of Harry Crowe at the end of the year. In 1959 she was hired by St. John's College. From 1962-1965 she was on the executive of the College's Chapter of CAUT. In 1966 she attained the rank of full professor. Two years later she became a member of Senate and in 1971 she was appointed to the Research Grants Committee and Research Board. Margaret was the first women appointed to the academic panel of the Canada Council and was a board member of the Associations of Universities and Colleges of Canada. She wrote two more books A Critical Study of Frederick Philip Grove , Twayne Publisher (1973), and The Other Side of the Rebellion (1986). She was appointed to Professor Emeritus in 1975. Margaret Stobie died July 15, 1990. The University of Manitoba holds a lecture in Dr. Stobie's memory.

Tesla, Nikola

  • nikola_t
  • Personne
  • 1856-1943

Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was a brilliant but eccentric Serbian-American inventor who discovered the basis of alternating current machinery and conducted experiments in wireless technology. In 1899-1900, at his laboratory in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Tesla discovered terrestrial stationary waves. In the 1970s, a group of scientists came together as the International Tesla Society which aimed to unlock any secrets contained in Tesla's account of Colorado Springs experiments and to compile all of Tesla's patents. Part of this effort was based in Winnipeg, as the "Manitoba Research Group," from which this collection had its origin. The International Tesla Society ceased operation in 2000.

Rudnyc'kyj, J.B.

  • rudnyc'kyj_j
  • Personne
  • 1910-1995

Jaroslav Bohdan Rudnyc'kyj was born to Ukrainian parents on November 28, 1910 in Przemyśl (Peremyshl') Austro-Hungarian Empire (now Poland). Rudnyckyj graduated with a Ph.D. from the University of Lviv in 1937, specializing in Slavic philology and the onomastics (geographical place names) of eastern Europe. To continue these and other studies abroad, he left his homeland in 1937, staying for short periods in Berlin, Munich, Rome, and Paris before lecturing in Slavic philology at the Ukrainian Free University, at Charles University in Prague, and at the University of Heidelberg. In 1949, shortly after his immigration to Canada, he was appointed Chairman of the new Department of Slavic Studies at the University of Manitoba, a position he held until 1976. He was also a co-founder of the Canadian branch of the Ukrainian Free Academy of Sciences (UVAN) in Winnipeg, serving as its president (1955-1970).

From 1963 to 1971, Rudnyckyj was a member of the Canadian Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism where he promoted the idea of a multilingual Canada. Rudnyc'kyj not only published widely and extensively but was also instrumental in developing a major Slavic collection for the University of Manitoba Libraries. He was interested in the philologies and literatures of East European languages, in the Slavic experience in Canada, and in the origin of place names. Rudnyc'kyj's publications consist of hundreds of articles and reviews, etymological dictionaries, translations, travel diaries, and onomastic studies. Rudnyc'kyj died in Montreal, Quebec on October 19, 1995.

Thistledown Press Ltd.

  • thistledown
  • Collectivité
  • 1975-

Thistledown Press was founded in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, in 1975 to publish and promote the poetry of both new and established prairie writers. One of Canada's premiere literary presses, Thistledown was formed by Glen Sorestad (1937-), a writer, editor, and teacher who earned his Master's in English at the University of Saskatchewan, and Neil Wagner, a prairie artist who was also a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan.

Thistledown grew from modest beginnings during meetings in the kitchens of the Sorestads and the Wagners into a series of business offices to having a staff of employees. From the outset, its goal has been to publish new and established writers, especially from the prairies, and to produce a consistently high-quality literary product. At the time of its formation, its founders believed that there were not enough outlets for Canadian poets and that Canadian publishing generally had not created "a wider reading audience for poets."

Thistledown Press was one of a number of publishers which developed in the mid-1970s as a response to a proliferation of quality poetry (be it lyric, narrative or experimental) from mostly young writers throughout the western provinces of Canada. The creative writing movement which took root in the prairies was responsible for bringing to light such poets/writers as Bert Almon, Peter Christenson, Lorna (Uher) Crozier, Lorne Daniel, Joseph D. Fry, Patrick Lane, William Latta, Andrew Suknaski and many others. Among Thistledown's most prolific writers were John V. Hicks and Gertrude Story, both of whom began to be published later in life.

As a Canadian literary publisher, Thistledown quickly earned a national reputation as a company willing to give young or new writers a chance. Recognition in the form of awards for publishing quality works soon followed. Among others, Thistledown won the Canadian Authors Association Award for the best book of poetry published in Canada in 1980 (Leona Gom's Land of the Peace ).

Thistledown became known for organizing special community events including editorial workshops and poetry readings and especially, an annual autumn gala in Saskatoon. Thistledown proudly considers itself part of western Canada's business, cultural and artistic community, taking special delight in publishing an author's first book. Many evenings of readings by such articulate, entertaining authors have been held under the auspices of Thistledown.

Through the financially-responsible efforts of the Sorestads and the Wagners, Thistledown kept its financial head above water. Sonia Sorestad and Susan Wagner (a University of Saskatchewan graduate), spouses of the founders, had the responsibility of working with an outside accountant for the purpose of planning, updating and overseeing all financial objectives. Several government agencies, such as the Canada Council, provided essential financial support.

To maintain its high standard of book publishing, Thistledown established an editorial board consisting of Allan Forrie, Patrick (Paddy) O'Rourke, Raymond Penner and Glen Sorestad, all University of Saskatchewan graduates. This board ensured that every submission considered for publication was thoroughly appraised, that fair criticism was provided the author and that the original objectives of Thistledown were maintained.

Currently, Thistledown concentrates primarily on publishing poetry and fiction, both for adults and young adults, exclusively by Canadian writers. They also publish a series of teachers’ resources. They have also published several anthologies for both adults and young adults, including one commemorating their 20th anniversary of publishing. They have currently published over 250 books, with 170 still in print. In 2002, Thistledown published their first creative non-fiction title.

As of 2001, Thistledown Press had received a total of 12 awards. The most notable being the Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best First Book, won by Jeffrey Moore’s Prisoner in a Red-Rose Chain .

In 2000, Glen Sorestad, one of the founding members of Thistledown, was named as Poet Laureate for the province of Saskachewan. He retired from his position at Thistledown in 2000. The company is currently owned and operated by Allan Forrie and Patrick O'Rourke, with a staff of four.

Grad, Bernard

  • grad_b
  • Personne
  • 1920 - 2010

Bernard Grad (1920-2010) was born February 4, 1920 in Montréal, Québec. He spent his early years living with his mother Raizel (Rosie) and his maternal grandmother until his grandmother’s death in 1932. Grad entered McGill University in 1937 through a scholarship. In January 1941, Grad was diagnosed with tuberculosis and was sent to a sanatorium for almost three years. He returned to McGill University in 1943. He graduated in 1944 and immediately began graduate studies in Biology. By 1949, he achieved his Ph.D. with high honors in Experimental Morphology.

In 1946, he met his future wife Lottie Dainoff. They were married in 1948. They had three children together, Julie Ann, Roland and Willis. Their first child, Julie Ann, died at age four in 1957. Roland was born in 1960 and Willis in 1962. Lottie died in 2016.

Grad had several personal experiences of “bio-energy” during his childhood and young adult life. These experiences sparked his interest in psychology and led to his study with Wilhelm Reich. Soon after obtaining his Ph.D. in 1949, Grad met Reich in Rangeley, Maine. This visit affected Grad strongly and when he returned to Montréal he decided to run his own studies on life energy parallel to his paid research in gerontology at the Allan Memorial Institute of Psychiatry at McGill University. Grad continued to visit Reich up to, and including, Reich’s trial in 1956.

In 1957, Grad began experiments with the Hungarian healer Oskar Estabany. In 1960, in order to gain funding from the Parapsychology Foundation in New York, Grad was asked to replicate his experiments with Dr. Remi Cadoret of the Department of Physiology at the University of Manitoba and to publish the results. Grad continued his work in healing as well as his work in gerontology for three decades. He became known internationally as a pioneer in healing studies.

Grad retired from McGill University in 1985 and then worked at the Université du Québec with the Armand-Frappier Santé Biotechnologie Research Centre until 1993. After his formal retirement, Grad continued lecturing and research on healing. In the several years before Grad’s death, Deborah Gagne interviewed Grad with the aim of compiling the interviews into a book. In 2015, a limited edition pre-publication proof was circulated among family and friends titled On the Road to Healing and Biogenesis: Memoirs of a Scientist. The book is currently under consideration for publication and broader distribution. Bernard Grad died December 27, 2010 in Montréal.

Subud
Soon after the death of their daughter in 1957, Grad and his wife Lottie learned about Subud, a religion headed by Muhammad Subuh Sumohadiwidjojo (also known as Bapak). By 1959, they helped open a Montréal Subud chapter. As part of the Subud practice, they later took the spiritual names of Raymond and Renée. Subud was part of their lives until their deaths.

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