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University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections

Alumni Association Inc.

  • alumniassociation
  • Corporate body
  • 1921-

The Alumni Association Inc. of the University of Manitoba was founded in 1921 by a handful of graduates. Their objective was to reach out to the growing numbers of graduates of the University and to sustain their interest and long-term support of the University. In 1935, the Association was incorporated in the Province of Manitoba as a not-for-profit organization with its own, independent volunteer Board of Directors. The Alumni Association operated largely as an independent association until 1958 when President Saunderson created the Public Relations and Information Office. The Alumni Association assumed the operative role of the Public Relations and Information Office and received direct funding from the University.

It is the Alumni Association that provides, preserves and strengthens the vehicle for alumni involvement. The Association and the University share many common interests and objectives. One of which is to maximize the University's opportunities to communicate with graduates on a regular basis. This communication reinforces the relationship between the University through the alumni affairs portfolio and the Alumni Association. Alumni Affairs is a department of the University directed by the Association's executive director. Its role is to facilitate alumni-related activities between the Alumni Association and the University.

In 2001, the Association celebrated its 80th anniversary. An Association with such a long life has faced many challenges and seen many changes. In large measure, it reflects the much broader history of the University. For example, until 1988, the Alumni Association had the responsibility for soliciting alumni donations to the University. In 1988, this function was transferred to the Department of Private Funding in order to consolidate all fund raising ventures. Also, on May 10, 1999, the President of the University of Manitoba and the President of the Alumni Association signed a funding agreement that allowed for no-fee alumni membership to all University of Manitoba graduates. This agreement has been renewed in 2002.

Barz, Sandra

  • barz_s
  • Person
  • 1930-

Born in Chicago in 1930, Sandra Barz completed her education at Skidmore College graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in 1952. She began her career in publishing and later became interested in Inuit art after purchasing a few pieces while visiting Canada. Thereafter she began to research and compile information relating to Inuit prints from Arctic Quebec/Puvirnituq, Baker Lake, Cape Dorset, Clyde River, Holman Island, and Pangnirtung. Her first exploration in this field involved developing, editing, and publishing 28 issues of Arts and Culture of the North from 1976 to 1984. She followed this work with a series of three volumes titled Inuit Artists Print Workbook, Volumes I, II, and III. The volumes catalogue over 8,000 Inuit print images dating from 1957 to the present, produced in the aforementioned communities, as well as prints produced independently of the Arctic co-operative system.

Barz developed her knowledge of printmaking and Inuit culture by making numerous trips to the Canadian Arctic, Alaska, Greenland, and Siberia over a thirty year period. By organizing tours to the Arctic, Sandra Barz connected participants with artists and printmakers and helped expand their appreciation for northern culture and the environment. To further connect art dealers, scholars, curators, and Inuit art enthusiasts, Barz coordinated and sponsored six Eskimo-(and Inuit Art) in-Art Conferences held in the United States and Canada. These venues included Toronto (Art Gallery of Ontario), Ottawa (National Museum of Man (currently Canadian Museum of Civilzation)), Winnipeg (Winnipeg Art Gallery), Washington, DC (The Smithsonian Institution), Chicago (The Field Museum), and Cape Dorset (West Baffin Eskimo Co-operative Limited).

Barz's papers detail over forty years of dedication to documenting Inuit artist biographies, the evolution of printmaking, and encouraging growing interest for Inuit art worldwide. She also documents the recognition given by governments to Indigenous art and culture with her collection of stamps from Europe, Greenland, United States, and Canada.

Bernard M. Rasch

  • rasch_b
  • Person
  • 1943-

Ontario architect Bernard M. Rasch obtained a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Manitoba's School of Architecture in 1968. Following graduation, he relocated to the Toronto area and, since 1973, has been a partner in several firms. He most recently retired from Area Architects Rasch Eckler Associates Ltd. His career highlights include receiving the Canadian Architect Design Award in 1976, his first overseas work on a shopping centre in China in 1983, holding the position of the President of the Ontario Association of Architects in both 1983 and 2000, as well as publishing in many design journals, both Canadian and American. His firm, Area Architects Rasch Eckler Associates Ltd., received the City of Toronto Business Recognition Award in 1999. He has also been a long time donor to The Winnipeg Foundation. Throughout his life, Rasch collected books and other materials on UFO sightings, paranormal phenomena, and occult societies.

Bouchard, Marie

  • bouchard_m
  • Person
  • 1953-

Born in 1953, Marie Bouchard grew up in a Manitoba farming community. She completed a Bachelor of Arts Honors degree at the University of Winnipeg in 1980, an Honors History degree in 1984 and a Master’s degree in Canadian History at the University of Manitoba in 1986. In 1985, as part of her Master’s work, she was invited by the Winnipeg Art Gallery to assist Inuit art scholar Jean Blodgett in the 1986 exhibition “Jessie Oonark: A Retrospective.” The accompanying exhibition catalogued detailed Oonark’s artistic oeuvre and her life at Back River based on interviews Bouchard conducted in Baker Lake, Nunavut.

Upon receiving a Canada Council Explorations Grant, Bouchard with her husband, Jim McLeod moved to Baker Lake in 1986 where she undertook indepth research on the people of Back River and the starvation of the 1950s. Her collection of archival research and oral history in the form of numerous documents and interviews also details the Government of Canada’s role during the relocation of Inuit from outlying camps to the fledgling community of Baker Lake during the 1950s and the Inuit survivors’ account of these events. These records are significant because they document the ensuing cultural upheaval and tragedy from starvation because of a lack of resources and Government plans to populate the North and promote sovereignty during the Cold War.

During her eleven years in Baker Lake, Bouchard developed her interest in Inuit art and economic development. She began supporting Inuit women artists and resurrected their creation of intricately embroidered wall hangings soon after arriving in the community. Bouchard eventually opened Baker Lake Fine Arts, a small, privately-owned cottage industry which brought financial support to the artists, as well as the necessary art supplies and marketing skills. With the closing of the local sewing centre, her venture allowed women in the community to continue to sew and care for their children at home. Her interests included all genres of art but primarily focused on the works on cloth which she showcased in public and commercial exhibitions both nationally and internationally. Her collection chronicles the production of Baker Lake works on cloth, soapstone carvings and drawing in the area over a ten year period through slide images, artist interviews and her library of Inuit art exhibition catalogues and books.

Bouchard was also instrumental in establishing the Baker Lake Historical Society which promoted cultural tourism and the revival of traditional knowledge for educational purposes.

Bouchard left Baker Lake for Winnipeg Manitoba in 1997. She worked as an independent art curator and consultant for the next ten years. She repatriated the representation and celebration of art by local Inuit artists by involving them in the representation of their work and hosting exhibition openings in the community. She curated major art exhibitions focused on Inuit and aboriginal art for institutions such as the National Gallery of Canada, the Art Gallery of Ontario, Itsarnittakarvik: Inuit Heritage Centre, Plug In ICA, and in the United States at the Los Angeles Fowler Museum, and New York’s American Indian Community House, as well as at several college galleries. She also took her collection of Baker Lake works on cloth to Japan for a major international exhibition. She has delivered numerous lectures and author essays and articles on Baker Lake works on cloth, drawings, sculptures, eco-museums and tourism.

Bradley Morrison

  • morrison_b
  • Person
  • 1925-2008

Bradley Morrison worked for the Ogilvie Flour Mills Company for 48 years and collected material relating to their operations. Marion E. Lyall, an employee of Ogilvie Mills, assembled the scrapbook in this fonds in 1903.

Canadian Officers Training Corps

  • cotc
  • Corporate body
  • 1914-1966

The University of Manitoba's Canadian Officer's Training Corps (C.O.T.C.) began in 1914 as a patriotic response to the outbreak of war in Europe. A series of meetings were held in September 1914 to organize a training program to prepare male students for active service overseas. The University Council appointed a Committee on Military Instruction which authorized the teaching of military science and tactics. A university corps was organized in the fall semester of the 1914-1915 year with 64 students taking extra classes to qualify as officers. Later, in March 1915, the Department of Defence instructed the University of Manitoba to join other universities throughout Canada to establish an official training curriculum under the auspices of the Canadian Officer Training Corps. Eight companies of sixty men each were formed with Professor E.P. Featherstonhaugh serving as captain and adjutant. In 1915 the Western Universities Battalion was established with the University of Manitoba contributing a company and a platoon. With the introduction of conscription legislation in 1917, military training was made compulsory for all male students. After the war, in 1920, the C.O.T.C. was reorganized by Lt. Col. N.B. Maclean. It continued in relative obscurity for nearly twenty years until the Second World War.

With the outbreak of the Second World War, the C.O.T.C. was quickly revitalized and its membership mushroomed from its peacetime level of 150 personnel to over 800. The Senate also passed regulations relating to academic credits or "bonuses" for students who joined the C.O.T.C. By 1941 all male students were once again required to enlist in a compulsory program of military training. After the war the C.O.T.C. continued to offer military training on a voluntary basis with new modernized and attractive programs, but with the return of peace its popularity rapidly declined with the organization dissolving in 1966.

Department of Native Studies

  • nativestudies
  • Corporate body
  • 1973-

The first Native Studies course "Native Peoples of Canada" was introduced at the University of Manitoba in 1973. This interdisciplinary course incorporate aspects of anthropology, sociology, history and economics. With the establishment of the Department of Native Studies in 1975 emphasis shifted to a broader-based study of the development of Indigenous societies. Questions were asked: What are the intellectual responses to Indigenous Peoples hopes, struggles, and vision for the future? What is the history of Indigenous Peoples from an Indigenous perspective? Today, the Department offers a program of interdisciplinary studies dealing with Indigenous Peoples in Canada. The range of courses includes the study of history and traditional cultures; art; contemporary social and economic issues; literature; Indigenous organizations, health, medical, legal and political issues. The Interdisciplinary (IDP) Graduate Program in Native Studies includes studies in variety of areas such as languages, literature, arts, women's issues, culture, history, material culture, contemporary perspectives, environmental studies, economic development, self-government and land claims.

Don Parker

  • parker_d
  • Person
  • 1917-2003

Don Parker was born in 1917 in Sanford, Manitoba, where he was raised by his parents, James and Rae Parker. Don served in the Royal Canadian Air Force from January 1940 to 1945. After the war, he joined his brother Doug in farming near Sanford and they also joined their father as partners in an International Harvester Dealership, which later became Parker Brothers. In 1952, he married Bernice Olmstead who was the assistant principal of Sanford High School. Don served on the Sanford-Ferndale History Committee and was instrumental in writing and in collecting historical information for the book Sanford-Ferndale, 1871-1987, a historical account of the area published in 1989. Don and Bernice had two daughters: Debra, who was born in 1957 and Heather, who was born in 1959 but who died soon after her birth.

Eyland, Cliff

  • eyland_c
  • Person
  • 1954-

Clifford Leslie Joseph Eyland was born November 7, 1954 to Kathleen Margaret Eyland (nee Williams) and Ronald James Eyland in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Eyland studied at Holland College, Mount Allison University, followed by the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD).

In the 1980s, Eyland began making paintings, drawings and notes in a 3”x5” index card format. Since then, much of Eyland’s work has explored the relationship between libraries and galleries, both of which are institutions that house and preserve. Eyland’s index card project has formed some of his largest installations which appear in libraries across Canada, such as Winnipeg’s Millennium Library, the Halifax Central Library and Edmonton’s Meadow Library. In addition to his large-scale library installations, Eyland has had several solo exhibitions and participated in many group shows throughout North America and Europe. In 2003, he was shortlisted for the nation RBC/Canadian Art Foundation painting award.

Eyland’s writing has been published in Canadian art magazines since 1983, and Eyland has been curating exhibitions since 1985. He served as a curator at the Technical University of Nova Scotia School of Architecture (now known as Daltech) from 1985 until 1994. In 1998, Eyland became the Director of Gallery One One One (now known as the School of Art Gallery), where he would remain until 2012. During this time, Eyland also taught at the University of Manitoba and served as a board member on Plug In ICA’s Board of Directors from 1995 until 2005.

Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences

  • agriculturalfoodsciences
  • Corporate body

Administrative History of the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences Manitoba Agricultural College was formerly opened in 1906. In the following year Manitoba Agricultural College became affiliated with the University of Manitoba so that the degree in agriculture could be conferred on students who had successfully completed the five-year course. However, the affiliation of Manitoba Agricultural College with the University was terminated by an Act of the Provincial Legislature in 1912 when the College was granted degree conferring powers. However, in 1916 the Act was amended and the affiliation between the College and University restored again. The University of Manitoba conferred the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A.) for the first time in May 1911. Regular instruction in Home Economics began the same year and the degree of Bachelor of Home Economics (B.H.E.) was first conferred in May 1918. On March 1, 1924, by Act of the Manitoba Legislature, the administration of Manitoba Agricultural College was transferred to the Board of Governors of the University and it was arranged that in future the instructional work of the College could be carried on as a Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics of the University. The length of the degree courses in both Agriculture and Home Economics was reduced to four sessions in 1927-1928 to conform with the other university faculties. In 1929, the Legislature selected the site in Fort Garry, already occupied by the Manitoba Agricultural College since 1913, as the permanent site of the University.A systematic program of work in the field of rural adult education began in 1940. In 1946 the Department of Agricultural Engineering was added to the faculty. In 1966 the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics opened the Centre for Applied Research at Glenlea, twenty kilometres south of Winnipeg.In 1970 the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics separated into two independent faculties, Agriculture and Home Economics. Beginning in 1971 the Faculty of Agriculture, through sponsorship from the Provincial Government, became involved with various foreign aid programs. This culminated in 1979 when the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) financed a joint agricultural program with the University of Zambia. In July 1991 the Faculty became the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences.

Faculty of Law

  • facultyoflaw
  • Corporate body
  • [ca.1860] -

The University of Manitoba first became involved in legal education in 1885 when it established a three-year course of studies leading to the LL.B. degree. This course did not include instruction, it simply prescribed a reading program with three annual examinations, which articled law students couId follow concurrently with the course prescribed by the Law Society. In the years 1911-1912, the Law Society was prompted by the Law Students Association to provide a short series of lectures. In 1913, H.A. Robson, then Manitoba's Public Utilities Commissioner and a former judge of the Court of King's Bench, organized a considerably improved course of lectures and began to lay the plans for the establishment in the following year of a permanent law school modeled after the Osgoode Hall Law School of the Law Society of Upper Canada.

The Manitoba Law School was jointly sponsored by The University of Manitoba and the Law Society of Manitoba. Both bodies took part in the planning from the beginning. In the summer of 1914, they entered into an agreement, subsequently endorsed by legislation, which provided for the creation of the School, offering a three-year course consisting of lectures and apprenticeship leading to both an LL.B. degree and a call to the Bar and admission to practice. Expenses of the School were shared equally by the two parent bodies, and its operations were supervised by a jointly appointed Board of Trustees. This arrangement between The University of Manitoba and the Law Society of Manitoba continued until 1966 when the Law School became the Faculty of Law of the University of Manitoba.

The Faculty of Law presently offers programs of study leading to two degrees, the LL.B. and the LL.M. The latter degree program was brought into existence in 1949 by the Manitoba Law School. It was substantially revamped by the Faculty of Law in 1968.

Faye Settler

  • settler_f
  • Person
  • 1916-2004

Faye Settler was born on December 13, 1916 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Growing up, she lived in Southey, Saskatchewan, Plum Coulee and Teulon, Manitoba, but moved back to Winnipeg with her family in 1928. Settler completed her formal education at St. John’s Technical High School. She married Bert Settler in 1938. In 1948, Faye Settler and her mother Maggie Brownstone opened a small antique store named the Curiosity Shop in their neighbourhood. By the mid-1950s they moved the Curiosity Shop to 313 Smith Street in downtown Winnipeg. The Upstairs Gallery opened in 1966 as an extension of the Curiosity Shop and exhibited the work of the Group of Seven and their contemporaries. Shortly after its opening, the Upstairs Gallery introduced a regular schedule of exhibitions by both local and national contemporary artists. In 1967, the Curiosity Shop became a Charter Member of the Canadian Antique Dealers Association, and in 1971, Upstairs Gallery was invited to join the Professional Art Dealers Association of Canada (now the Art Dealers Association of Canada.) As a result of the success and growth of both the Upstairs Gallery and the Curiosity Shop, Settler relocated to a larger space at 266 Edmonton Street. Stemming from Faye Settler’s interest in Inuit art, the Upstairs Gallery became well-known for its Inuit sculpture and tapestry exhibitions and Settler’s unique and personal relationship with Baker Lake artists. In 2001, Faye Settler made a gift to the Winnipeg Art Gallery of the Faye and Bert Settler Inuit Collection. In 2003, Settler received the Manitoba Woman Entrepreneur of the Year Lifetime Achievement Award as well as the Art Dealers Association of Canada Award for Lifetime Achievement. Faye Settler passed away on January 21, 2004. The Upstairs Gallery closed on March 1, 2005.

Gerus, W. Oleh

  • gerus_o
  • Person
  • 1939-

Dr. Oleh Walter Gerus was born on July 9, 1939 in Bludlow, Volhynia, in what was then, part of eastern Poland (present-day Svitanok, Ukraine), to parents, Reverend Serhij and Anna Gerus (Palianychka). From 1946 to 1950, he received his primary education in the Displaced Persons Camps in Munster Lager and Fallingbostel, in Northern Saxony, Germany. Upon immigrating to Canada with his parents, he completed his public school education in Vita and Winnipeg. He received his BA (1962 History and Slavic Studies) and MA (1964 History) from the University of Manitoba and his PhD from the University of Toronto (1970), under the supervision of Robert H. McNeal. He was awarded a doctoral fellowship to Lomonsov State University, Moscow (1966-67), where he studied with Piotr A. Zaionchkovsky. In 1967 Oleh Gerus lectured at the University of Manitoba and the following year he was appointed as an assistant professor at Brandon University. In 1969 he joined the University of Manitoba’s Department of History where he served for over 47 years. In 1996, he was promoted to full professor. He retired in 2016. Dr. Gerus is married to Yvonne (Bonnie) née Kowalchuk, and the couple have 3 children: Helene, Andrew and Roman.

Dr. Gerus‘s fields of specialization and teaching include: Ukrainian history, modern Russian history, Ukrainians in Canada, Ukrainian Orthodox Church history and the late Metropolitan Ilarion (Ivan Ohienko). His publications focus on the Ukrainian experience. The Canadian media has often called upon Dr. Gerus to provide commentary on the Ukrainian community in Canada, as well as on current events taking place in Eastern Europe and Russia, because of his knowledge and expertise of the history and politics of the region. His strong commitment to the university community has been reflected in: participating in the Centre for Ukrainian Canadian Studies, Policy Council; various committees within the Department of History, including the associate headship; and serving on the board of directors of St. Andrew's College and college committees of St. Paul’s College. Dr. Gerus’s contributions to the University of Manitoba have been recognized through various awards and accolades, which include: the University of Manitoba Outreach Award; the University of Manitoba Dr. & Mrs. Campbell Outreach Award; the Fr. Cecil Ryan, SJ, Rector’s Award (St. Paul’s College); and the bestowing on him the degree of Doctor of Canon Law (DCL) Honoris Causa (St. Andrew’s College). Always focused on the students, Dr. and Mrs. Gerus endowed a scholarship in European history for St. Paul's College students as well as a memorial bursary in the Faculty of Education.

Throughout his academic career Dr. Gerus has remained very active in the Ukrainian-Canadian community: first as a student leader in the Ukrainian Student’s Union of Canada; later as an executive member of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in Canada; as president of the Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre, Oseredok; and as a member of the boards of the Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko and the Oseredok Foundation. Dr. Gerus accompanied the Oleksander Koshetz Choir of Winnipeg on its concert visits to Ukraine and to the Ukrainian diaspora in Europe and South America where he lectured on the Ukrainian Canadian experience. In the late 1980s, as Ukraine inched closer to independence, Dr. Gerus was involved in founding the Canadian Friends of Rukh, the popular movement for political and cultural reconstruction in Ukraine. He also assisted Ukraine’s academia, by working with and helping to develop a curriculum for the re-born University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, a historically important institution of learning. Following Ukraine's independence, Dr. Gerus was invited by the Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences in 1992 to participate in Ukraine's celebration of Ivan Ohienko's (Metropolitan Ilarion) 110th anniversary of his birth and his remarkable intellectual achievements.

In addition to numerous articles on Ukrainian Orthodox Church history and the history of Ukrainians in Canada, Dr. Gerus’s major publications include an edition of Dmytro Doroshenko’s A Survey of Ukrainian History (Winnipeg: Humeniuk Foundation, 1975), which he edited, updated and introduced, and (with Denys Hlynka) The Honourable Member for Vegreville: The memoirs and diary of Anthony Hlynka, MP (Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2005).

Glass, Helen

  • glass_h
  • Person
  • 1917-2015

HELEN PRESTON GLASS, B.Sc.N., M.A., M.Ed., & Ed.D., (Columbia), LL.D. (Hon. Causa, Memorial), LL.D. (Hon. Causa, Western)

Born in Regina, Saskatchewan in 1917, and educated in Saskatchewan schools until the end of grade twelve, Dr. Helen Preston Glass began her university education at the University of Saskatchewan’s School of Home Economics. After one successful year there, she decided instead to pursue a career in nursing, and completed a three-year degree program at the Royal Victoria Hospital School of Nursing in Montréal, Québec in 1939. She then stayed on at that facility as a supervisor in the Anaesthetic Department, and subsequently moved on to many other nursing positions in general hospitals in Dunnville, Ontario; Abbotsford, British Columbia; and Prince Albert, Saskatchewan between 1941 and 1945. From 1952 to 1953, Dr. Glass worked as a clinic nurse in an obstetric clinic in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Dr. Glass began her career teaching nursing at the Holy Family School of Nursing, in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, from 1953 to 1955. Here, she taught courses in foundations, issues and trends in nursing at both undergraduate and graduate levels, and developed and taught a new clinical teaching program. She then moved on to Victoria General Hospital, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, where she taught both basic sciences and clinical nursing courses. She earned a Certificate in Teaching and Supervision from the University of Manitoba in 1958, and furthered this pursuit at Columbia University Teacher’s College, completing a Bachelor of Science in Nursing in 1960 and a Master of Arts in 1961. She then became the first person to assume the position of Education Secretary for the Manitoba Association of Registered Nurses (MARN). As such, she was responsible for planning and conducting workshops and providing consultation to Schools of Nursing. Glass acted as liaison with other health disciplines in Manitoba, and as secretary to the various committees associated with MARN. She was also instrumental in creating the Manitoba Nursing Research Institute (now the Manitoba Centre for Nursing and Health Research).

In 1962, she joined the Faculty of the University of Manitoba School of Nursing, teaching programs for both new students and registered nurses. She was primarily responsible for the design and implementation of introductory and third year level courses for the first four-year baccalaureate nursing program which began in 1963. After completing her Master of Education in 1970, and Doctor of Education (Nursing) in 1971, again at Columbia University, Dr. Glass returned to the Faculty, and in 1972 became full professor and Director of the School of Nursing. She received honorary Doctor of Law degrees from Memorial University in 1983, the University of Western Ontario in 1986, St. Francis Xavier University in 1991, and the University of Montreal in 1993, and an honorary Doctor of Science degree from McGill University in 1995.

Dr. Glass has been the recipient of a number of awards honouring her achievements in both nursing and education. Upon her graduation from the Royal Victoria Hospital School of Nursing in 1939, she received the award for Proficiency in Bedside Nursing. She was awarded the Dr. Katherine E. McLaggen Fellowship Award from the Canadian Nurses’ Foundation for both 1968/69 and 1969/70, and the Marion Woodward Award and Lecture from the University of British Columbia in 1974, and the Queen’s Silver Jubilee Medal in appreciation of exemplary service in 1977. She was named one of 1979's Women of the Year by the YWCA. She was also awarded the R. Louise McManus Medal from the Nursing Education Alumni Association of Teachers’ College, Columbia University, and the Jeanne Mance Award of the Canadian Nurses’ Association in 1992. In 1993 she was given the Special Achievement Award by MARN, among many other honours.

Dr. Glass has been both member and chair of several professional associations and committees, at the university, provincial, national, and international levels. Examples include membership in the Council of the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing (CAUSN), the National Nursing Committee of the Canadian Red Cross Society, the Board of Directors of the Big Sister Association of Winnipeg and the University of Manitoba Senate Executive Committee. She has served on the Manitoba Association of Registered Nurses Social Policy Committee, and the YW/YMCA Board of Directors and the Manitoba Health Research Council.

Dr. Glass has also been an invited member of the Task Force on Euthanasia and Definition of Death, Law Reform Committee of Canada, and was a member of the Review Board for the National Health Grants Directorate. She has consulted on health care proposals and nursing education programs within Canada, and has helped develop submissions to the Advisory Council on the Status of Women, the Hall Commission, and the Canada Health Act. She has been President of MARN, President and member of the Canadian Nurses’ Association (CNA) Board of Directors, and a member of the Canadian Nurses’ Foundation (CNF) Board of Directors. She was active in the Canadian Conference University Schools of Nursing, and served on the Canadian Delegation to the World Health Assembly in 1983 and again in 1985.

Politically, she was very active in educating nurses across Canada and enlisting their support to successfully introduce health care amendments to the Canada Health Act, which went through 1982 to 1984, while Dr. Glass was president of the CNA. She has also been active in the Canadian Health Care Economics Association, and presented the first paper by a Canadian nurse on “Economics of Nursing: Cost Effective Strategies,” to the Second Canadian Conference.

Following Dr. Glass’s retirement from the faculty of nursing at the University of Manitoba in 1986, the Canadian Nurses Foundation established the Doctor Helen Preston Glass Fellowship for Doctorate Study, awarded annually to a student pursuing their graduate degree in nursing.

In 1988, Dr. Glass was made an Officer of the Order of Canada and received the Order of Manitoba in 2008. In 1995, she was given a honourary life membership in the Canadian Public Health Association, in recognition of outstanding services in the promotion of public health. In 1989, after her retirement from the University of Manitoba, Glass was named Professor Emerita. 1999, the University of Manitoba honoured Dr. Glass by naming their new nursing building after her. Her Royal Highness, Princess Anne, dedicated the building during her visit for the 1999 Pan American games. In 2013, Glass was presented with the Centennial Ward from the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba.

Dr. Glass published widely on nursing and health care in professional journals in Canada and the United States, and internationally in French, English, and Danish. Dr. Helen Glass passed away on February 14, 2015.

Grove, Frederick Philip

  • grove_f
  • Person
  • 1879-1948

Frederick Philip Grove arrived in Manitoba in September 1912. Although he kept his prior life very much a secret, he was born in 1879 as Felix Paul Greve in Radomno, a small Prussian town on the post-World War I German-Polish border. Greve grew up in Hamburg where he graduated from the famous humanistic Gymnasium Johanneum in 1898 and then studied classical philology at Bonn University. In late July 1909, he faked his suicide and immigrated to North America, taking second class passage on the White Star Liner "Megantic" from Liverpool to Montreal. The three years spent in the United States are described in ASA, 1927, except that Grove fails to mention the year he operated a small farm in Sparta, Kentucky, with Else Freytag-Loringhoven who had joined him in Pittsburgh in 1910. In Canada, he was a teacher/principal in a variety of rural schools, including Rapid City where he lived for seven years before moving to Ottawa in 1929. There, he joined Graphic Publishers until 1931, when he settled on an estate in Simcoe, Ontario. Grove wrote and his wife Catherine Wiens opened a Froebel Kindergarten. Grove suffered a crippling stroke in 1944 and although he continued to write, his health deteriorated. He died on August 19, 1948.

During his Manitoba years (1919-1929), Grove published twelve books, including Over Prairie Trails (1922), The Turn of the Year (1923), Settlers of the Marsh (1925), A Search for America (ASA, 1927, eEd. 2000), Our Daily Bread (1928) and It Needs to be Said (1929). He also wrote many short stories, reviews, essays and articles, and a very large number of poems (publ. 1993, eEd. 2007). In Ontario, several more books were published, starting with The Yoke of Life (1930). Fruits of the Earth (1933), Master of the Mill (1944), and his official autobiography In Search of Myself (ISM, 1946, eEd. 2007) followed. His "ant-book", the Swiftian satire Consider Her Ways (1947), was published as a fragment. Many more unfinished typescripts are among his papers. Grove was endebted to Stefan George's "Mache" or way of crafting for all his poetry, and to Flaubert's symbolic realism for his prose works. He is a key figure in Canadian literary history and is known for his vivid descriptions of life on the prairies which often tended to be dark and difficult.

Frederick Philip Grove is one of the most important and debatable novelists in Canadian literature. An intriguing aspect of this man is the mystery surrounding his origins. Grove kept secret his life prior to his arrival in Winnipeg, Manitoba in December 1912. Where he came from, who he was, what he did and why he left may never be absolutely known. However, a number of scholars have come to believe that Grove’s original name was Felix Paul Greve.1 Many aspects of this man’s life tie in with Grove’s, many do not. In accordance with increasing academic support in favor of Paul Greve and Frederick Philip Grove being the same individual, this thesis has been accepted in the present context.

In all likelihood, Frederick Philip Grove was born February 14, 1879 at Radomno, on the Polish-Prussian border. He studied at Bonn University in 1898 and sometime between 1909 and 1912 immigrated to North America. An important element of Grove’s life was his role as an educator. He spent many years teaching in various rural communities of Southern Manitoba. From January to June 1913 he taught in the town of Haskett and during the following summer was appointed principal of the Intermediate School in Winkler, where he remained until July 1915. Tena (Catherine) Wiens was a fellow teacher and became Grove’s close friend and confidante. On August 2, 1914 they were married, the bride aged 22, the groom giving his age as 41.

In the next seven years Grove taught in six different schools, as well as pursuing his own academic interests. In September 1915 he enrolled at the University of Manitoba as an extramural student, majoring in French and English. During this time, his daughter Phyllis May was born. Grove did not receive his Bachelor of Arts degree until 1922.
In the summer of 1922 Grove became principal of the high school in Rapid City, Manitoba, and although he suffered from several long-term illnesses, he taught there until 1924.
Two of Grove’s life-long associates were Arthur Leonard Phelps and Watson Kirkconnell, both of whom he first met in March 1923 at a teacher’s convention in Winnipeg. Kirkconnell was his “private library service”, while Phelps provided connections with many influential literary people such as W. A. Deacon, then literary editor of the Toronto Saturday Night, Graham Spry, later executive president of the Canadian Clubs, and Lorne Pierce, editor of Ryerson Press.

Between 1919 and 1929 Grove published twelve books including Over Prairie Trails (1922), The Turn of The Year (1923), Settlers of the Marsh (1925), A Search for America (1927), Our Daily Bread (1928) and It Needs to Be Said (1929). During this same period he also wrote several stories, reviews and articles, and a collection of poems dedicated to his daughter, Phyllis May, who died suddenly on July 20, 1927 at the age of twelve. These poems are highly emotional and portray the intense sorrow suffered by the Groves at this time.
In 1928 Grove conducted two lecture tours sponsored by the Canadian Clubs, one in Ontario (February to April) and the other in the Western provinces (September and November). Grove was a gifted lecturer, not only on literary subjects, but also on education, art, culture, farming, democracy and science. His wide-ranging interests and encyclopedic knowledge are especially evident in the collection of unpublished articles and addresses. Grove became quite popular and his works were well received by the Canadian public.
In September of 1929, just prior to the Depression, Grove left Rapid City, Manitoba and in December moved to Ottawa to join Graphic Publishers. However, due to personal disputes, he left the company in March of 1931 and used the money he had saved from this venture to buy a forty-acre farm in Simcoe, Ontario. Graphic Publishers declared bankruptcy on August 16, 1932. Before the Groves left Ottawa, their son, Arthur Leonard (named after Arthur Phelps), was born August 14, 1931.

While working hard at renovating their large, white frame farm house, the Groves opened the Froebel Kindergarten, whose pupils were members of the Simcoe English Club. Enrollment increased so that by 1935 it included the “first form” (for children age six or seven), plus extra courses in oral French, nature study, home geography, and art. Meanwhile, Grove farmed his land and the family was basically self-sufficient. Grove was realizing his dream of being a gentleman farmer and literary man. However in 1939, because of poor health, he was forced to give up farming. As the Depression persisted, fewer and fewer parents could afford the expense of private school. Accordingly, the school became less selective and began accepting children with serious learning problems. Mrs. Grove was particularly gifted in working with slow learners, and this ability provided her with an income for many years.

But Grove’s health was failing. In April 1944 he suffered a crippling stroke that totally paralyzed his right side. However, his mind remained clear and he continued his reading and writing by dictation. Early in 1944 Pelham Edgar established a fund for the “Canadian Writers Foundation Inc.” and in March Grove was made one of its first three beneficiaries. He received a grant of $100 per month which continued until his death.

The last few years of his life were painful and difficult for Grove; nonetheless he continued to write. In March 1944 he published The Master of the Mill, and in 1946 published his autobiography, In Search of Myself, destined to win the 1947 Governor-General’s award for non-fiction. He also managed to complete the final draft of Consider Her Ways before his final seizure in May 1946.

For most of Grove’s last two years, having lost his speech, his needs were served not only by his wife but by his teenage son, Leonard. After his death on August 19, 1948, Grove’s body was buried beside his daughter Phyllis May, in Rapid City, Manitoba.
Frederick Philip Grove is a key figure in the history of Canadian literature. His outstanding literary achievements and contributions as a writer, teacher, critic, and philosopher are becoming increasingly recognized and appreciated. Much has been written of this man and much more will be written in the years to come because of the power of his writings, their enduring popularity, and because of his own life and personality.

Haas, Maara

  • haas_m
  • Person
  • 1920-2012

Maara Haas (née Lazeczko) was born in Winnipeg on Feb. 12, 1920. Her father, Michael Lazeczko was the first Ukrainian-Canadian pharmacist. At the age of fifteen she received an IODE Laura Secord award for her essay “Let No Man Call Me Foreigner.” After studying journalism at the University of California (Berkeley) in 1939, she spent two years as a reporter and literary reviewer in the United States before returning to Winnipeg. In 1947 she was awarded First Prize by the Manitoba Poets' Society for her poem The Prodigal. In 1959 she was awarded a certificate of achievement (hramota) by the Ukrainian Free Academy of Sciences (UVAN) in Winnipeg for her efforts to popularize and translate the poetry of Taras Shevchenko into English.

Haas had a varied career as a poet, writer, playwright, actress and creative writing teacher. She had a chap book of her early poetry entitled Viewpoint: Collected Poems published by Ryerson Press in 1952. Over the years her work appeared in The Canadian Review of Literature, The Indian Record, The Washington Post and The Canadian Dimension. In 1976 McGraw Hill Ryerson published her first novel The Street Where I Live about growing up in Winnipeg's ethnically diverse North End. That same year her stage play Otherworlds/ Other Faces was produced by the Winnipeg YMCA. In the 1980's Haas taught creative writing in local schools, on Cree and Salteaux reservations at Oxford House and Grand Marais, and in Bermuda. Her second book, On Stage with Maara Haas (Lilith, 1986) consisted of short stories and poems. Turnstone Press published Why Isn't Everybody Dancing in 1990. The book was about slavery in Bermuda and expressed Maara’s grief after the loss of her daughter.

Maara Haas died on August 29th 2012.

Harland, Gordon

  • harland_g
  • Person
  • 1920-2003

Gordon Harland was born near Treherne, Manitoba on December 27, 1920. He received a B.A. from the University of Manitoba in 1942 and a Bachelor of Divinity from United College in 1945. He taught church history at United College from 1946 to 1955 before starting the Ph.D. program at Drew University in New Jersey in the fall of 1955. Harland taught at Drew University while doing course work to complete his doctorate. Harland successfully completed his doctorate in 1959. He left Drew University in 1968 to found the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Manitoba. He would remain at the University of Manitoba for three years before joining the faculty at Penn State University. He returned to the University of Manitoba in 1973 and was made a Professor Emeritius upon his retirement in 1992.

Harland received a Doctor of Divinity from the University of Winnipeg in 1976 and one from Queen's University in 1989. He was the first occupant of the Chair of Christian Thought at the University of Calgary in 1987. He is the author of three books: The Thought of Reinhold Niebuhr (1960), Christian Faith & Society (1988), and co-author of Religious Studies in Manitoba & Saskatchewan (1993), as well as numerous articles. Harland combined the roles of preaching and teaching. He preached at several churches and was a sought after speaker, lecturing all over North America. Harland died on December 08, 2003.

Havens, Betty

  • havens_b
  • Person
  • 1936-2005

Betty Havens was born October 9, 1936. She obtained a B.A. from Milwaukee-Downer College in 1958 and an M.A. in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin in 1965. From 1972 to 1982, she served in the position of Research Director with Manitoba Health. She initiated the Manitoba Longitudinal Study of Aging in 1971 that is still being used by researchers today. From 1982 until 1994, Havens acted as Provincial Gerontologist for Manitoba Health. From 1990 until 1994, she was Assistant Deputy Minister for Manitoba Health. In 1992, Havens was Associate Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba. From 1992 until her death in 2005, Havens was Research Associate for the Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation, University of Manitoba. Concurrently, she was Professional Associate, Centre on Aging. In 1994, Havens became Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba, a position she held until her death in 2005. Havens wrote numerous articles throughout her career and was the recipient of several awards and distinctions including the YWCA Professional Woman of the Year. In 1994, she received a D.Litt. from the University of Waterloo. In 1997, she was made a senior scholar at the University of Manitoba and in 2005 she was the recipient of the Order of Canada. Havens died March 1, 2005.

Holt, Simma

  • holt_s
  • Person
  • 1922-2015

Simma Holt (née Milner) was born March 27, 1922 in Vegreville, Alberta. She attended the University of Manitoba from 1941-1944, graduating with majors in English and Psychology.
During her time at the University, she was the first female managing editor of the student newspaper The Manitoban and was also a university reporter for the Winnipeg Free Press. Upon graduation in 1944, she began working as a teletype operator and reporter for the Canadian Press in Calgary. In the autumn of 1944, at age twenty-two, she began her thirty-year journalism career with the Vancouver Sun.

She married Leon Holt, a freelance photographer and later high school teacher in 1949. They were married for thirty-seven years, until his death in 1985.

In 1974, Simma Holt left the Vancouver Sun to successfully run as the Liberal member of Parliament for Vancouver-Kingsway. Holt was the first Jewish woman in Canadian history to be elected to Parliament. She sat for one term losing her seat in 1979. During her time in Parliament, she was Vice-Chair of the Standing Committee on Justice and a member of its subcommittee on the Penitentiary System. She was also a member of several Standing Committees: Broadcasting, Films and Assistance to the Arts; Privileges and Elections; Labour, Manpower and Immigration; National Resources and Public Works; Procedure and Organization; Transport and Communications; Finance, Trade and Economic Affairs; and Health, Welfare and Social Affairs.

In 1976, while still an MP, she became an occasional columnist for the Toronto Sun. Holt became a columnist for Ottawa Sun and Vancouver Business. She also was a freelance writer for Reader's Digest, Maclean’s, Fairlady in South Africa, Chatelaine and other magazines. Holt wrote four books: Terror in the Name of God: The Story of the Sons of Freedom (1965), Sex and the Teen Age Revolution (1967), The Devil's Butler (1971), The Other Mrs. Diefenbaker (1983), and Memoirs of a Loose Cannon (2008).

From 1981 to 1985, Holt was a member of the National Parole Board. She also acted as a researcher and writer in the presidential campaign of George Bush from 1987 to 1988, although later quit as she did not agree with Republican politics.

Holt was the recipient of numerous awards. In 1964 she was named Women of the Year for Canada in Arts and Letters for her book Terror in the Name of God. She was awarded, in 1969, the Jubilee Award by the University of Manitoba Alumni Association in recognition of her “distinguished achievement” in the 25 years since her graduation. The following year she won the Bowater Award of Merit in the sociological division for her series of articles on changing morality and sociological upheaval of teenagers. In 1985, she was a nominee for the Vancouver YWCA Women of Distinction award. She was inducted into the Canadian Newspaper Hall of Fame in 1996 and that same year she also was appointed a member of the Order of Canada. Her Order of Canada citation included the recognition that “she has demonstrated a lifetime commitment to assisting those suffering from injustice, persecution and poverty. Her perceptive and impassioned writings have contributed to positive social change by raising public awareness of injustices in society.” In 2002, she received a Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal for her contribution to public life.

Simma Holt passed away in Burnaby, BC on January 23, 2015.

Imich, Alexander

  • imich_alex
  • Person
  • 1903-2014

Alexander Imich was born in Częstochowa, Poland (then part of the Russian Empire), in 1903. As a child, Imich was a voluminous reader and especially enjoyed the works of Jack London and Joseph Conrad. He pictured himself as an adventurer and as such, decided that his calling was to be a sea captain. To accomplish this dream, he entered Marine School, but had difficulty overcoming the constraints which anti-Semitism put on him. One instructor, for example, declared that any Jews he took with him on his vessel would be left in the middle of the Atlantic. Imich decided a career change was in order. He developed a strong affinity for the natural world and as such, he went to Krakow to study Zoology at Jagiellonian University in 1920.

During his university career, anti-Semitism once again plagued Imich’s aspirations as some of the faculty did everything in their power to hold him back including forcing him to study in English, a language he spoke none of at the time, and assigning him a topic for his doctoral work that had already been covered by a previous doctoral student, thus making his dissertation very likely to be dismissed. Nonetheless, Imich was able to overcome these obstacles and obtain his doctorate in 1927, his dissertation being deemed “good enough”.

While at Jagiellonian, Imich fell in love with a chemistry student named Genia Mendelsohn, who eventually became his wife. While they were married, Imich worked in his father-in-law’s factory while Genia worked to become a painter. Imich’s life was shattered when Genia suddenly disappeared with her art instructor, only to turn up weeks later, her mental health decayed to the point that her father was in the process of committing her to an asylum near Warsaw. Genia spent several months in the asylum and Imich visited her regularly. Nonetheless, the incident irreparably damaged their relationship and they were divorced soon after Genia’s release.

While visiting Genia at the asylum, Imich met and fell in love with a young lawyer named Wela Katzenellenbogen who he married in 1936. Wela came from a very old German-Jewish family that included Karl Marx, Felix Mendelssohn, David Halberstam and Martin Buber. During World War II, both Imich and Wela were interred in a Russian labour camp near the White Sea for two years, but were liberated following the German attack on Russia in 1941. Imich and Wela managed to escape the brunt of the war’s horrors by relocating to Samarkand, Uzbekistan from 1942-1947. They returned to Poland to find that their parents and various members of their extended family had died in concentration camps. After this, Imich and Wela moved to France where Imich had a brother. In 1952 they moved to the United States, first to Upper Black Eddy, Pennsylvania and then to New York, dividing their week between the two cities.

To make a living, Imich initially took up chemistry, but once Wela made for herself a career as a psychologist in 1965, Imich turned to his real passion: parapsychology. Imich had been interested in the paranormal since childhood. By 13, Imich was dabbling with table tilting and with Ouija boards. As early as 1932, Imich published an article in the German parapsychology journal Zeitschrift für Parapsychologie that explained his encounters with a Matylda S. who was among the first psychics Imich encountered. While living in France, Imich began interacting with a network of mystics, yogis and gurus, particularly via the Ramakrisha Vivekananda Order, an organization that dealt in yogic philosophy.

In New York, Imich met medium Eileen J. Garrett and proposed to her an international meeting of parapsychologists, an idea that meshed with the Parapsychology Foundation’s First International Conference of Parapsychological Studies that Garrett had in the works and that took place in Utrecht, Holland, in 1953. For the rest of his life, Imich remained active in parapsychology, attending some conferences, delivering speeches at others and judging parapsychology-themed essay contests. He edited the book Incredible Tales of the Paranormal in 1995, entered the IM School of Healing Arts in New York, graduating two years later with the title “Reverend”, and in 1999, founded the Anomalous Phenomena Research Center (APRC) which sought to advance parapsychology through research and demonstration. Wela passed away in 1986, but Imich continued to live in the same apartment that they had rented in 1965.

Imich passed away on June 8, 2014, shortly after being named the oldest man in the world at the age of 111 in April 2014.

Indigenous Languages of Rupert's Land

  • indigenouslanguagesrl
  • Corporate body
  • 196?-198?

The purpose of the Indigenous Languages of Rupert's Land Collection was to preserve material related to the Indigenous languages in Canada, which are not normally retained in the general library collection, in order to meet the instructional needs of the University of Manitoba Department of Linguistics, and the Native Languages program of the Department of Native Studies. One copy of each title was retained. The language families included were Algonquian, Athapaskan, Inuit-Aleut, and Siouan.

Intercontinental Exchange Inc.

  • wce
  • Corporate body
  • 1887-

The Winnipeg Commodity Exchange was founded in 1887 by a group of Winnipeg grain merchants as the Winnipeg Grain and Produce Exchange. It served initially as a forum for cash trades in Canadian grains but, in 1904, introduced trading in wheat futures and subsequently added futures trading in barley, oats, flax, and rye. In 1908, the Exchange was re-organized as a voluntary, unincorporated, nonprofit organization and its name was changed to the Winnipeg Grain Exchange.

The Grain Exchange grew in importance with the Canadian grain economy so that by 1929, it played a major part in the establishment of world grain prices and the establishment of the Canadian Wheat Board in 1935. In 1943, the Wheat Board was given a monopoly in the marketing of wheat. In 1949, this monopoly was extended to oats and barley. The importance of the Exchange began to revive in 1963 with the establishment of a futures market in rapeseed (subsequently re-named canola). In 1972, a market in gold futures was opened, at which time the Exchange changed its name to the Winnipeg Commodity Exchange. In 1974, part of the trade in barley, oats, and feed wheat was restored to the Exchange.

During its operation, the Winnipeg Commodity Exchange Inc. (W.C.E. or the "Exchange") was Canada's only agricultural futures and options exchange. Agricultural contracts traded on W.C.E. included futures contracts for canola, flaxseed, domestic feed wheat, domestic feed barley, oats, milling wheat, durum wheat, canola meal, and peas. Options on certain of these products were also traded.

In 1996, the Winnipeg Commodities Exchange was Incorporated by an Act of the Manitoba Government. In 1998 WCE Clearing Corporation was established, and two years later the Manitoba Securities Commission took over regulatory responsibility from the Canadian Grain Commission.
In 2001, WCE demutualized, moving from a member-owned structure to a shareholder for-profit structure. On February 1, 2004, WCE celebrated 100 years of Futures Contract Trading. December 17, 2004 marked the end of open outcry trading, with WCE becoming the first North American commodity exchange to go fully electronic.

The WCE was acquired by Intercontinental Exchange (ICE) on August 28, 2007, and was re-named ICE Futures Canada (IFCA) at the beginning of 2008. Ten years later, the remaining contract on IFCA (canola) was moved to ICE’s New York exchange (ICE Futures U.S.) in July 2018, thereby ending the Winnipeg exchange’s operation after 131 years.

John Hirsch

  • hirsh_j
  • Person
  • 1949-1973

John Hirsch was born in Hungary in 1930. He came to Canada in 1947 at age 17 through the War Orphans Project of the Canadian Jewish Congress. This project worked with children under 18 who had survived the Holocaust but no longer had an adult to act as guardian. He was taken in by Alex and Pauline Shack, and their daughter Sybil, in Winnipeg and continued a close relationship with the family throughout his life.

In 1952, Hirsch graduated with a BA in English literature from the University of Manitoba. He established a puppet theatre before co-founding Theatre 77 with Tom Hendry in 1957. In 1958, Hirsch and Hendry amalgamated Theatre 77 with Winnipeg Little Theatre into the Manitoba Theatre Centre (MTC). This theatre became the model for regional theatre through Canada and the United States. Hirsch was the first artistic director of MTC and stayed until 1966 when he then became co-artistic director at the Stratford Festival from 1967-1969. From 1974-1978, he was head of CBC’s television drama. Hirsch was consulting artistic director at the Seattle Repertory Theatre from 1979-1981. He returned to the Stratford Festival as artistic director from 1981-1985.

Hirsch is recognized as one of Canada’s most prominent theatre directors. He was awarded the Order of Canada in 1967. He also received Obie, Outer Circle Critics' and Los Angeles Drama Critics' Circle Awards for his productions in the United States. The John Hirsch Award for Most Promising Manitoba Writer was established by the Manitoba Foundation for the Arts in 1989 to honour him.

Hirsch died on August 1, 1989 in Toronto after being ill with AIDS.

John L. Hamerton

  • hamerton_j
  • Person
  • 1929-2006

John Laurence Hamerton was born September 23, 1929 in Hove, England. He received his B.Sc. from the University of London in 1951. He worked on the Science Staff of the Medical Research Council (MRC) Radiobiology Research Unit from 1951-1956. He was the Senior Science Officer for the British Royal Museum from 1956-1959. He worked on the British Empire Cancer Campaign at the University of London from 1959-1960. He was lecturer and head of the Cytogenetics Section of Guy's Hospital Medical School from 1962-1969. While at Guy's he collaborated on studies that helped pave the way for the first bone marrow transplants. He completed his D.Sc. from the University of London in 1968.

Hamerton came to Winnipeg in 1969 to create the Winnipeg Children's Hospital's first human genetics department. He established an international reputation as a researcher, making major contributions in prenatal diagnosis, cytogenetics and ethical issues relating to the Human Genome Project. He was a founding member and former President of the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists. He was the former President of American Society of Human Geneticists and the Genetics Society of Canada. Upon his retirement from the University of Manitoba, he was named Distinguished Professor Emeritius in 1997. That same year he became a member of the Royal Society of Canada. In 2003 he was named an Officer of the Order of Canada. Dr. Hamerton died on February 9, 2006.

Johnston, George

  • johnston_g
  • Person
  • 1886-1973

George Johnston was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, in 1886 and immigrated to Canada in 1906. In Winnipeg Johnston worked for the T. Eaton Company (1906-1908), the Canadian Pacific Railway (1908-1951), and the Searle Grain Company (1951-1961).

From 1907 to 1909 he was a member of the 90th Battalion, (Royal) Winnipeg Rifles, and was part of the unit’s contingent attending Quebec’s Tercentenary Celebrations in 1908. During the First World War he served in Europe with the 12th Canadian Field Ambulance unit from April 1916 to May 1919. After the war, he was actively involved in the 12th Field Ambulance Association (1920-1970), serving as its president in 1965; worshipped at St. Mark’s Anglican Church in St. Vital (1927-1970); belonged to the Ancient Order of Foresters; and was a member of the St. John’s Ambulance Association.

George Johnston passed away in 1973. Predeceased by his wife, he was survived by a daughter, a son, and two brothers in Ireland and England.

Kathleen Rice

  • rice_k
  • Person
  • 1883-1964

Kathleen Rice was born in St. Marys, Ontario, in 1883, to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lincoln Rice. She graduated from the University of Toronto in 1906 and began a career as a math teacher. She taught in Belleville, Ontario before moving to western Canada. Once in the west, she taught mathematics in Alberta and Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

In 1913, Kathleen and her brother, Lincoln, decided to stake a homestead near The Pas, Manitoba. Shortly thereafter, war broke out and Lincoln, who later became a Lieutenant Colonel, joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force. Kathleen decided to stay on the homestead alone. After teaching herself about geology and prospecting, she headed to the Herb Lake area north of The Pas. She claimed an island - later called Rice Island - in Weksusko Lake, which turned out to be very rich in copper and nickel.
While it is rumoured that Rice and her business partner, Richard (Dick) Woosey, turned down $250,000 for their property, she eventually sold it to International Nickel (INCO) for approximately $20,000.

Kathleen Rice occasionally returned to Ontario to visit her family, but the majority of her adult life was spent in Northern Manitoba. She died in Brandon in 1964.

Kent, David A.

  • David_Kent
  • Person
  • 1948-

David A. Kent was born in Winnipeg in 1948 and did his undergraduate degree in history and English at the University of Winnipeg (1970). After completing his MA in English at Queen’s University, he taught at the University of British Columbia for two years (1971-1973) before doing a PhD at York in Toronto (1979). He began teaching at Centennial College in Toronto in 1978 and retired at the end of 2011. He has been active in such professional organizations as the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English and the Modern Language Association of America.

He has published numerous reviews and articles and written, edited, or co-edited a dozen books on a variety of topics, including English poet Christina Rossetti, a family history, a parish history, early modern English literature, Romantic parodies, and religious poetry. He has a special interest in Canadian poet Margaret Avison.

Together with his wife, Margo Swiss, he began The St. Thomas Poetry Series at St. Thomas’s Church, Huron Street, in Toronto in 1988. In 1996 the readings series was complemented by the publication of books by Christian poets. The series is ongoing. As of 2016, thirty publications have been issued.

Keystone Agricultural Producers

  • kap
  • Corporate body
  • 1984-

Keystone Agricultural Producers is a democratically controlled farm lobby organization which represents and promotes the interests of agriculture and agricultural producers in Manitoba. It is a grassroots organization wholly run and funded by its members, with all policy set by producers throughout Manitoba. KAP has standing policies on a variety of issues including Safety Net Programs, Western Grain Marketing, Land and Resource Use, Taxation, Environment and Sustainability, Livestock Manure Management Strategy, Farm Labour, Health and Safety, Affiliations, Farm Inputs and Finance, Transportation, Government Services, Property Rights and Wildlife Resources and Trade. Policy is set by delegates and directors elected from individual and group members. Close to twenty committees, comprised of members and the President (ex officio), research a number of issues and report back to the executive and the General Council. Both the elected executive and management are responsible for implementing policy in the best interests of the members. Its mission is to be Manitoba's most effective, democratic policy voice, while promoting the social, physical and cultural well being of all agricultural producers.

King, John M.

  • king_j
  • Person
  • 1829-1899

John M. King was born in Yitholm, Scotland in 1829. While still quite young, he enrolled at the University of Edinburgh where he studied mathematics, philosophy, and theology graduating with an M.A. in 1856. After furthering his theological studies at the University of Halle in Germany, he came to Canada to take up Presbyterian ministries in Galt, Ingersoll, Columbus and Whitby, Ontario (then known as Canada West). He was appointed minister of Gould Street in 1863, which then became St. James Square Church in Toronto in 1879. In 1873, King married Janet Macpherson Skinner, who operated with her sister a school for young women. In 1882, King received the degree of D.D. (Doctor of Divinity) from Knox College.

While serving as moderator of the General Assembly in 1883, he accepted the position of first principal and professor of theology at Manitoba College in Winnipeg, forerunner of the University of Winnipeg. In 1886, King's wife and son died. King made a memorial window for his wife in the convocation hall of Manitoba College (the window was later moved to Bryce Hall). King lived in Winnipeg until his death in 1899. He was widely-known and highly regarded as a leading Presbyterian theologian, educator and administrator. His daughter, Helen, married the Reverend Charles William Gordon (Ralph Connor). For more information, please see Box 14, folder 12.

Klymasz, Robert Bohdan

  • klymasz_rb
  • Person
  • 1936-

Dr. Robert Bohdan Klymasz was born in Toronto, Ontario in 1936. In 1957, he obtained a B.A. from the University of Toronto, and later studied at the University of Manitoba (M.A., 1960), Harvard University (1960-1962), Charles University, Prague (1962), and Indiana University in Bloomington (Ph.D., 1971). His doctoral dissertation “Ukrainian Folklore in Canada: an Immigrant Complex in Transition” was supervised by Richard M. Dorson. He married Shirley Zaporzan in 1963, and they had two daughters, Andrea and Lara. In 1967, he joined the Canadian Museum of Civilization and served as its first programme director for Slavic and East European Studies. Throughout his career, he has held several prestigious positions, including the executive director of the Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre (Oseredok) in Winnipeg, visiting associate professor in Folklore at Memorial University's Department of Folklore, visiting professor in Folklore and Slavic Studies at the University of California at Los Angeles, and visiting scholar at Harvard Divinity School.

In 1993, as a curator with the Museum of Civilization, Dr. Klymasz began a comprehensive study on community life in Gimli, Manitoba. Fieldwork on this project began in 1993 and continued on an annual basis every summer until the summer of 2001. The project, which became known as the Gimli Community Research Project (G.C.R.P.), was meant to offer insight on what makes the Town of Gimli a safe and prosperous town in which to live. The early work was low-key in nature, focusing on the town's life and culture, for example, attending meetings of the town's council, various public forums, proceedings of the local public law court, and meetings of the Board for the New Iceland Heritage Museum. Gradually, the fieldwork shifted to monitoring phenomena that gave Gimli its "dreamtown" quality. The final report was completed in 2002 and was entitled ""Dream Town": Art and the Celebration of Place in Gimli, Manitoba."

Upon his retirement in 2000, he was named Curator Emeritus with the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Dr. Klymasz is a renowned expert on Ukrainian Canadian folklore, having extensively written, published, and lectured on this subject. His publications include An Introduction to the Ukrainian-Canadian Folksong Cycle (1970), Ukrainian Folklore in Canada (1980), 'Svieto': Celebrating Ukrainian-Canadian Ritual in East Central Alberta Through the Generations (1992), and The Icon in Canada (1996). Dr. Klymasz also published numerous articles in scholarly journals, and many reviews of books and exhibitions in Canada's Ukrainian and Icelandic ethnic press. He continues to pursue his recent interests with grants from the University of Alberta (CIUS) and the University of Manitoba (CUCS).

Dr. Klymasz was awarded the Marius-Barbeau Prize by the Folklore Studies Association of Canada (Laval University) for his studies in Ukrainian Canadian Folklore. In 2005, he completed the Archival Research Project on Walter Klymkiw, the conductor of Koshetz Choir, titled "Playing around with Choir": the Correspondence and Papers of Walter P. Klymkiw. The manuscript is held at the University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections. Between 2006 and 2012 he completed several archival research projects including “A priest, a maestro, a community: epistolary insights into the music culture of Winnipeg's Ukrainian community, 1936-1944” (2006-2007), “Winnipeg Papers on Ukrainian Music” (2008), “Nuggets from the past: quotations on the Ukrainian experience in Canada” (2007), “Winnipeg Papers on Ukrainian Book Culture” (2009), and “Winnipeg Papers No. 5 “Cossacks and Indians? Encounters, Abductions, Guilt, Ballads and Empathy on the Prairie and Beyond” (2012). The manuscripts are held at the University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections. In 2013 a Ukrainian translation of Klymasz's 1971 Indiana University PhD dissertation was published in Ukrainian, under the title, 'Ukrains'ka narodna kul'tura v kanads'kykh preriiakh' (Kyiv: Duliby, 2013).

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