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  • Corporate body

Angus Shortt is a well known Winnipeg artist and painter of wildlife art. He was born on September 25, 1908 in Belfast, Ireland. His family immigrated to Canada in 1911 and settled in Winnipeg, Manitoba. In 1926 Shortt started working for Brigden's commercial art firm as a wood engraver. As an apprentice he was sent to study at the University of Manitoba under Professor L. LeMoine Fitzgerald. Shortt was interested in painting wildlife and studied wild birds plumage and anatomy. In 1932 Shortt obtained a federal collecting permission to hunt and taxidermy wild birds and in 1935 he obtained a position at the Museum of Manitoba where he worked on restoration of a Treherne Plesiosaur skeleton. Shortt was also interested in studies of wild birds (Birds of Paradise, Hummingbirds, Clay-Colored Sparrow, Sunbirds, Raptors, and Hawks). He presented his research to the Natural History Society of Manitoba (1936-38). There he met his wife Elizabeth (Betsy) Haak who became his long time partner in life and work. In 1939, when Ducks Unlimited was formed, he became an artist-technician for the public relations department. There he specialized in painting ducks and geese and donated his painting to many Ducks Unlimited fund-raisings. Angus Shortt also designed series of the Manitoba wildflower and bird paintings; series of 12 medallions, featuring designs based on provincial wildflowers for Canada's Centennial; series of greeting cards depicting variety of ducks; and sets of playing cards with wildlife illustrations for the U.S. Playing Card Co., Ohio. He illustrated Treasure of Waterfowl(1946), Birds of Colorado (1965), and Ducks and Men: Forty Years of Co-operation in Conservation (1978). To honor Angus Shortt, Ducks Unlimited named a lake (Shortt Lake) to honor his longtime work. In 1962 he designed a fifteen cent stamp for Post Office Department. He retired in 1973. Angus Shortt was recipient of many awards and medals. He was awarded the Good Citizenship Award in 1969; the Centennial Gold Medal of Remembrance by the Manitoba Historical Society in 1970; and the Golden Jubilee Medal was presented to Mr. Angus Shortt on the occasion of the fiftieth Anniversary of the Accession of Her Majesty the Queen to the Throne in 2002. Angus Shortt's wife Elizabeth (Betsy) Shortt was a naturalist, gardener, and former judge of floral arrangements for the Winnipeg Horticultural Society. She received a number of scholastic awards including the Governor General's Gold Medal in 1933 and became a member of the Manitoba Naturalist's Society in 1934. Angus Shortt's brother, Terry Shortt was also artist and worked at the Royal Ontario Museum as an illustrator and the chief of art and exhibits. Angus Shortt passed away on January 8, 2006, at the age of 97 and his wife Betsy passed away on July 1, 2006, at the age of 90.

"You Can't Beat Fun"

  • youcantbeatfun
  • Corporate body
  • 1940-2002

The musical “You Can’t Beat Fun” was originally conceived and musically written by 19-year-old pianist Sam Seetner in 1939, a 2nd year Science student at the University of Manitoba, with the help of two of his friends Earl J. Beattie (book), and Edward Parker (stage conception). Seetner and Beattie wrote the lyrics. The production was staged by over 40 University of Manitoba music students (including future game show host “Monty Hall”) on January 11th -13th, & 15th, 1940 at the Winnipeg Civic Auditorium. The story follows the love lives of four college freshmen who enter a university beset by cut backs and reduced to four faculties: Love, Rhythm, Home Economics and "Hotcha."

In 2002 the production was revived to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the University of Manitoba. It played February 20 - 22, 2002 at the Walker Theatre.

Abernethy Elevator Local #702

  • abernethy
  • Corporate body
  • 1948-2001

The Abernethy, Saskatchewan grain elevators were built in the early 1900s by various grain companies. Five elevators existed in Abernethy: Beaver (1904), International (1906), Maple Leaf (1908), North Star (1904) and Farmers’ Elevator Company (1907). In 1948, the United Grain Growers purchased the oldest Abernethy elevator from Reliance Grain. Over the next twenty years, United Grain Growers purchased the three major elevators in Abernethy, consisting of some of the oldest still functioning in Canada. At the same time of United Grain Growers' expansion into Abernethy, a re-organization of Locals followed to provide representation for labor. The United Grain Growers Local #702 formed in 1949 and included farmers from Balcarres, Saskatchewan. Local #702 remained active as a representative union for the farmer owned company until United Grain Growers’ merger with Agricore United in 2001.

Aboriginal Council of Winnipeg

  • Corporate body
  • 1990-

The Aboriginal Council of Winnipeg (ACW) came into existence in June 1990, as a result of the amalgamation of the Winnipeg Council of Treaty and Status Indians and the Urban Indian Association of Manitoba. It was further motivated by the desire to “form one representative political organization for the Aboriginal people of Winnipeg” (Robinson, ACW Letter, 1990).

The mission of the ACW is to give power to the Indigenous community of Winnipeg in order to help strengthen individual and group potentiality. The vision of the ACW is to see the urban Indigenous community of Winnipeg thrive in a natural, healthy way, with vitality and room to grow. The organization also advocates for education, training and employment, women, and youth, and further addresses emerging issues and promotes economic development (Aboriginal Council of Winnipeg, www.abcouncil.org/about-us-cfm, 2011). The organization is still active and continues to serve and represent the interests of the Indigenous community of Winnipeg.

Access & Privacy Coordinator's Office

  • Access & Privacy Coordinator's Office
  • Corporate body
  • 2001-

The University of Manitoba Access & Privacy Coordinator's Office was initially established as the FIPPA/PHIA Office within the Archives & Special Collections unit in 2001. The purpose of the office was to implement The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) and The Personal Health Information Act (PHIA) on behalf of the University. In 2008, the FIPPA/PHIA Office underwent administrative changes, being renamed the Access & Privacy Coordinator’s Office under the Vice-President (Administration). In 2010, the office was transferred to the newly formed Office of Fair Practices & Legal Affairs.

Agassiz Centre for Water Studies

  • agassiz_centre
  • Corporate body
  • 1968-1976

The Agassiz Centre for Water Studies was established in 1968 to assist and coordinate the interdisciplinary study of water resources and utilization in western Canada. Colloquia and seminars were sponsored in cooperation with the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources. In 1969 the Centre's administration was reorganized and steering, publications and conference committees were formed. By 1972 research topics and programs began to range widely - so much so that some were considered peripheral to the main thrust for the Centre's existence. As a result, the Centre's terms of reference were revised and tightened. By 1975 the Centre was working on the last year of a five-year grant from the Inland Water Directorate of the Department of the Environment and was having difficulty getting approvals for research projects that were deemed not a priority by the department. A proposal was put forward to radically alter the internal structure and research direction of the Centre. However, by this time, the Centre was no longer considered a viable enterprise and it began an orderly wind-down of its ongoing research. The Centre effectively terminated operations on December 31, 1976.

Age and Opportunity Inc.

  • age-opportunity
  • Corporate body
  • 1957-

From 1992 to 1995 the Stradbrook Senior Centre in Winnipeg offered a course for seniors on how to write their life story. This course was offered under the auspices of Age and Opportunity, a non-profit organization established in Manitoba in 1957, which aids seniors in a variety of ways beneficial to their daily life. These courses were taught by Tanya Lester. In 2002 the "Writing your Life Story" class continued to be offered on a thrice yearly basis, but was no longer taught by Tanya Lester.

Aging in Manitoba Longitudinal Study

  • Corporate body

The Aging in Manitoba Longitudinal Study began in 1971 under the direction of Dr. Betty Havens, and was initially run through Manitoba Health and then through the University of Manitoba. It was funded by the provincial and federal governments. A.I.M. was a large-scale longitudinal panel study of older adults in Manitoba that included nearly 9000 participants throughout the province. The design of the study included three independent cross-sectional samples that were conducted in 1971, 1976, and 1983. These samples were subsequently followed in 1983-1984, 1990, 1996, 1997, 2001, 2005, and 2006. The interviews collected information on socio-demographic, social psychological, physical and mental health status and functioning, economics, leisure activities, care and support networks and consumption of services. Overall, A.I.M provided both cross-sectional and longitudinal data that represent 30 years of research on the experience of aging for older Manitobans. Research using A.I.M data has addressed such issues as social isolation and loneliness, self-perceived financial security, self-perceived health status, use of physical services, successful aging, formal and informal social support and care, and sample mortality. Dr. Betty Havens was the director and principal investigator of the Aging in Manitoba study from its inception in 1971 to her death in 2005, whereupon leadership of the study passed to Dr. Barbara Payne. The Aging in Manitoba Longitudinal Study concluded in 2007.

Agricore Cooperative Ltd.

  • agricore_cooperative
  • Corporate body
  • 1998-2001

Agricore Cooperative Ltd. was created November 1, 1998, through the friendly merger of Alberta Wheat Pool Ltd. and Manitoba Pool Elevators. It existed for only three years, then merged with United Grain Growers to form Agricore United in November 2001. Before the merger, it was one of the largest agribusinesses in Western Canada. Moreover, as Agricore United is a publicly traded company, Agricore can be seen as the last of the farmer-owned cooperatives, a movement that significantly altered prairie-farming practices in the twentieth century. Agricore officially began operations on November 1, 1998. Extensive preparations were made to ensure that a seamless transition occurred when the two historic cooperatives became one new entity. Winnipeg was selected as the head office and staff was shifted accordingly. In late 1999, Agricore weathered its first serious crisis when the cooperative's unionized staff went on strike. The next year and a half saw Agricore expand its business in a variety of ways including the establishment of high throughput elevators in Elva, Manitoba and at the junctions of highway 3 and 14 between Morden and Winkler, in Manitoba. Though wheat and grain prices in 1999-2000 reached historic lows, Agricore managed to increase earnings and further enhance its reputation as one of western Canada's most influential agribusinesses. On July 30, 2001, Agricore announced that the boards of both UGG and Agricore had unanimously agreed to a merger that would create a new company, Agricore United, which would be modeled after UGG's share structure. On November 1, 2001, the merger took place and Agricore, the last of the prairie cooperatives, ceased to exist.

Agricore United

  • agricore_united
  • Corporate body
  • 2001-2007

On July 30, 2001, Agricore announced that the boards of both United Grain Growers and Agricore Cooperative had unanimously agreed to a merger that would create a new company, Agricore United, which would be modeled after UGG's share structure. On November 1, 2001, the merger took place and Agricore, the last of the prairie cooperatives, ceased to exist.Since the merger, Agricore United became the largest agribusiness in western Canada dealing in grains, oilseeds, special crops, marketing, agri-products, agri-food processing, and feed manufacturing. The merger also allowed for a greater ability to access public markets for additional capital. The company has weathered adverse growing conditions like drought and floods in various parts of western Canada, low grain stocks, and growing competition from international markets. While offering farmers management services like financing, risk management, agronomic expertise, and access to end-use markets, Agricore United has been able to capitalize on a wider system of developed infrastructure networks of port terminals, country elevators, and farm service centres. Built on the foundation of Agricore United and Saskatchewan Wheat Pool, Viterra was formed in 2007 through a merger.Refer to the finding aids for earlier history of United Grain Growers Ltd. and Agricore Cooperative Ltd.

Air Canada

  • air_canada
  • Corporate body
  • 1936-

Air Canada is the flag carrier and largest airline of Canada. The airline, founded in 1936, provides scheduled and charter air transport for passengers and cargo to 178 destinations worldwide. It is the world's ninth largest passenger airline by number of destinations, and the airline is a founding member of Star Alliance, an alliance of 26 member airlines formed in 1997. Air Canada's largest hub is Toronto Pearson International Airport, located in Mississauga, Ontario, while its corporate headquarters are located in Montreal, Quebec. The airline's parent company is the publicly traded firm ACE Aviation Holdings. Air Canada had passenger revenues of CA$9.7 billion in 2008.

Canada's national airline originated from the Canadian federal government's 1936 creation of Trans-Canada Airlines (TCA), which began operating its first transcontinental flight routes in 1938. In 1965, TCA was renamed Air Canada following government approval. Following the 1980s deregulation of the Canadian airline market, the airline was privatized in 1988. In 2001, Air Canada acquired its largest rival, Canadian Airlines. In 2006, 34 million people flew with Air Canada as the airline celebrated its 70th anniversary.

Air Canada operates a fleet of Airbus A330, Boeing 767, and Boeing 777 wide-body jetliners on long-haul routes, and uses Airbus A320 family aircraft, including the A319, A320, and A321 variations and Embraer E170/E190 family aircraft on short-haul routes. The carrier's operating divisions include Air Canada Cargo and Air Canada Jetz. Its subsidiary, Air Canada Vacations, provides vacation packages to over 90 destinations. Together with its regional partners, the airline operates on average more than 1,370 scheduled flights daily.

Alberta Wheat Pool Ltd.

  • alberta_wheat_pool
  • Corporate body
  • 1923-1998

The Alberta Wheat Pool, a voluntary cooperative organization, was incorporated in 1923 to create stability in the wheat market in response to a downward trend in wheat and farm prices in 1920-1923. Its first president was Henry Wise Wood. The pool, from its first office in Calgary, became one of the largest grain-handling cooperatives in Canada. Owned and controlled by its members, it operated country grain elevators across Alberta and northeast British Columbia. It handled approximately two-thirds of Alberta's grain exports. In addition to its original mandate of enabling farmers to bargain collectively with grain buyers, the AWP also provided grain services for members including storage and handling, grain merchandising, fertilizer and seed grain sales, farm equipment, financing, and agricultural research. It has also ensured farmers a voice in the formation of national grain-marketing policies and has been involved in the establishment of the Canadian Wheat Board. On November 1, 1998 the Wheat Pool merged with Manitoba Pool Elevators to form Agricore. In 2001 Agricore merged with United Grain Growers Ltd. to form Agricore United. In 2007 Agricore United was purchased by the Saskatchewan Wheat Poll and the new company was rebranded to be known as Viterra. For further information see Tides in the West / Leonard D. Nesbitt. - Saskatoon : Modern Press, 1962.

Alpha Omega Women's Alumnae

  • aowa
  • Corporate body
  • 1958-

The Alpha Omega Alumnae, an organization of women university graduates of Ukrainian descent, was founded in 1958 by a small group of twelve women with a desire to promote and foster Ukrainian cultural activities within the broader community. The organization has focused on promoting the work of amateur and professional artists of Ukrainian origin. The visual and performing arts have been supported with art exhibitions, musicals, recitals, lectures and readings by published authors. In the 1960s, in collaboration with the Winnipeg Art Gallery, the Alumnae sponsored a major show of the works of internationally known sculptor Alexander Archipenko. This was followed by a show of the art of William Kurelek. Interest in contemporary literature led, in 1978, to a Canada-wide writing competition which called for stories based on experiences of "Ukrainian Life in Canada". In celebration of Winnipeg's Centennial, the Alumnae honoured those women of Ukrainian descent who had graduated from the University of Manitoba prior to 1940. This resulted in a publication entitled The Beginnings: Ukrainian Women Graduates, University of Manitoba. In 2008, the Alumnae celebrated its fiftieth anniversary with a major celebratory musical event and a "Garden Party" honoring the founding members.

Alumni Association Inc.

  • alumniassociation
  • Corporate body
  • 1921-

The Alumni Association Inc. of the University of Manitoba was founded in 1921 by a handful of graduates. Their objective was to reach out to the growing numbers of graduates of the University and to sustain their interest and long-term support of the University. In 1935, the Association was incorporated in the Province of Manitoba as a not-for-profit organization with its own, independent volunteer Board of Directors. The Alumni Association operated largely as an independent association until 1958 when President Saunderson created the Public Relations and Information Office. The Alumni Association assumed the operative role of the Public Relations and Information Office and received direct funding from the University.

It is the Alumni Association that provides, preserves and strengthens the vehicle for alumni involvement. The Association and the University share many common interests and objectives. One of which is to maximize the University's opportunities to communicate with graduates on a regular basis. This communication reinforces the relationship between the University through the alumni affairs portfolio and the Alumni Association. Alumni Affairs is a department of the University directed by the Association's executive director. Its role is to facilitate alumni-related activities between the Alumni Association and the University.

In 2001, the Association celebrated its 80th anniversary. An Association with such a long life has faced many challenges and seen many changes. In large measure, it reflects the much broader history of the University. For example, until 1988, the Alumni Association had the responsibility for soliciting alumni donations to the University. In 1988, this function was transferred to the Department of Private Funding in order to consolidate all fund raising ventures. Also, on May 10, 1999, the President of the University of Manitoba and the President of the Alumni Association signed a funding agreement that allowed for no-fee alumni membership to all University of Manitoba graduates. This agreement has been renewed in 2002.

American Association of University Professors / University of Manitoba Chapter

  • AAUP/UM
  • Corporate body
  • 1949-

The University of Manitoba Chapter of the American Association of University Professors was established in 1949, and was possibly the first Canadian chapter of the association. Members of the first executive included William Stobie, President, and E.G. Berry, P. Gelrud, and W. Leach, who served as committee members.

Annual Archives Symposium

  • archives_symposium
  • Corporate body
  • 1979

Dr. Richard Bennett, the University of Manitoba Archivist between 1978 and 1998, proposed the Symposium to discuss some of the collections housed in the Archives. The proceedings were held in University Centre on November 23, 1979.

Arts Faculty Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1970-

The Faculty of Arts was formed when the Faculty of Arts and Science dissolved in 1970. In 1970, the Faculty of Arts signed an agreement with St. Paul's and St. John's Colleges, to unify their respective faculty members. The Arts Faculty Council is made up of the faculty members from Arts, St. Paul's, and St. John's Colleges, as well as undergraduate and graduate student representatives.

Association of Universities and Colleges in Canada

  • aucc
  • Corporate body
  • 1911-

The Association of Universities and Colleges in Canada (AUCC) is a national non-governmental, not-for-profit organization that is funded through membership fees and revenues from publications and contract management services. The AUCC represents 93 Canadian public and private not-for-profit universities and university colleges. The AUCC provides a forum for discussion and a framework for action at the federal level, and facilitates the development of public policy on higher education. It was founded in 1911 and its membership ranges from small, undergraduate liberals arts institutions to large, multi-campus universities offering a broad selection of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs. The activities of AUCC are coordinated by its secretariat, located in Ottawa.

Atlas Wrecking Company

  • atlas_wrecking
  • Corporate body
  • [1933-1970]

The Atlas Wrecking Company was established in the early 1900's by David Billinkoff. Coming to Winnipeg from Russia on Christmas Eve, Billinkoff used his only dollar to buy a handsaw, going door to door offering to cut wood. He also began hauling loads of frozen gravel from Birds Hill to the City of Winnipeg, and eventually developed a scrap lumber resale business. After David's passing in 1933, his son Alecander quit school to run Billinkoff Wrecking and Lumber, and was eventually joined by his brothers Ben and Joe. In the 1950's the business became two distinct companies, Billinkoff's Lumber and the Atlas Wrecking Company. Over the years, Atlas completed many major wrecking, salvaging, or demolishing projects occurring in Western Canada. This includes the demolition of various public structures in Winnipeg such as the old Canadian National Telegraph's building at the corner of Portage Avenue and Main Street, the old Winnipeg Electric Company's steam generating plant, and the old Canadian Distillery in St. Boniface to name a few. Before and during each demolition, pictures were taken to document the event, making a unique contribution to the city's evolving landscape.

Border Crossings

  • bordercrossings
  • Corporate body
  • 1982-

Border Crossings is a Winnipeg-based arts magazine that was founded in 1982 by Robert Enright, the magazine’s first Editor-in-Chief. It first began publishing under the title Arts Manitoba in the mid-1970s, with the intention of being a bi-monthly arts and culture magazine. Beginning in 1978, financial troubles almost put an early end to the publication, but in 1982 it was re-invigorated with the help of a small board of directors which included Meeka Walsh. In 1985 it began publishing under its current name, a title which was more in-line with Enright and Walsh’s shared vision of a magazine which transcended borders, both artistically and physically. Walsh took over as Editor-in-Chief in 1993, a position which she continues to occupy as of 2017.

Border Crossings features a wide range of arts and culture topics such as artist profiles, theatre reviews, interviews, photography portfolios and editorials, from both a Canadian perspective and an international one. Its content is “more curated than edited” and it stands alone as Canada’s premier arts magazine.

Brewing & Malting Barley Research Institute

  • BMBRI
  • Corporate body
  • 1948-

Activities of the malting and brewing industries in the barley improvement were formalized in 1948 when the Barley Improvement Institute (now the Brewing and Malting Research Institute) was established to cooperate and assist, financially and otherwise , in the development and testing of improved barley varieties and to disseminate factual information on the production, improvement, marketing and processing of malting barley. Sixty eight years later the Institute continues to provide variety evaluation & funding from its Winnipeg office.* For a more detailed history consult Box 1 Folder 2 &; Box 25 Folder 3 of the fonds.

Burrows Community Hall

  • burrows
  • Corporate body
  • 1961-

The Burrows Community Hall was organized on October 3, 1961, with Charlie G. Fisher as Chairman and Grace Miner as Secretary. The Hall is available to residents of the district for social events and meetings. It is administered by a board of trustees consisting of four members elected for two year terms.

Business and Professional Women's Club of Winnipeg

  • bpwcw
  • Corporate body
  • 1924-

The Business and Professional Women's Club of Winnipeg (BPWCW) was established in 1924 to provide a forum for women professionals to meet, discuss common problems and lobby for women's issues. Issues in which the club was interested included equal pay for work of equal value, better treatment of women in the workplace, and the creation and improvement of the Canada Pension plan. The club was originally situated in downtown Winnipeg at the St. Regis Hotel, but moved in 1946 to a house at 3 Evergreen Street in the Osborne Village neighborhood of Winnipeg. In 1965, the Evergreen Clubhouse was sold and the club moved back downtown to a space above Moore's restaurant on Portage Avenue. The club is currently located on Lombard Avenue in downtown Winnipeg.

CKY (Radio station : Winnipeg, Man. : 1923-1948)

  • cky_radio
  • Corporate body
  • 1923-1948

The Manitoba Telephone System was authorized to operate CKY in 1923. The first program was broadcast on March 13, 1923. The final time slot on Tuesday evening was occupied by University Hour, which was a series of lectures presented by university professors. It quickly became one of its most popular shows. University on the Air was produced on the CKY radio station during the 1940's. Professors from various departments of the University of Manitoba presented lectures on a wide variety of topics. Topics included agriculture, science, war and women's interests.

Calgary First Spiritualist Church

  • cfsc
  • Corporate body
  • 1920-

The Calgary First Spiritualist Church (CFSC), formally incorporated on 18 November 1920, began life during WWI with the invitation in a local paper in 1915 from Mrs. Ada Garrad (ca. 1881-1962), a medium, to meet with those interested in psychic work. Various informal groups formed, as well as the First Spiritualist Progressive Lyceum, which was established on 10 July 1915. The Lyceum was the Spiritualist equivalent of Sunday School, but based on the teachings of Andrew Jackson Davis; it was well attended in its early years. In 1920, the Lyceum joined the Western Star group in forming the Calgary First Spiritualist Church under the direction of Mrs. Garrad as medium and lecturer and her husband Gerald Harry Garrad (1879-1963) as board president. The new church purchased a building on the corner of 7th Avenue and 3rd Street Southeast, which had been an old Moravian church. The church received its charter from the Government of Alberta; the founding members included Robert and Alice E. Rushton, Edward and Nellie Leighton Potts, William Charles and Annie Biles, and William and Anne Eshelby. In the church’s early years, a professional medium from the United States, Mrs. Z. Duval, was in Calgary and trained many of the mediums who continued to work at the local level for many years. Other notable leaders in the early church were Rev. Matilda Louise Parkyn, Rev. Harry Collett, Rev. Eleanor Collett, Rev. Jack Ross, Helen Davis, Annie Slater, Tom and Tomena Merrifield, and Myra Harshman. In 1929, the Spiritualists’ National Union of Canada (now the Spiritualist Church of Canada) recognized CFSC’s affiliation, with Rev. Martha S. McGuire as a signatory.
In the 1950s, the Lyceum, which had been dormant for some years, was re-established, but officially closed in 1961. The teaching aspect of the CFSC, however, has remained, as it offers a number of courses for adults and children involving Spiritualism, mediumship, and other topics. In 1972, the Church was required to vacate its building due to urban renewal plans by the City of Calgary, and moved to its present location at 1601-1603 6th Avenue North; this second church building was dedicated in 1974. Throughout, the CFSC has offered regular healing, message, and meditation services, as well as workshops and séance circles, and has a large library of books and other publications relating to Spiritualism. Many of the children who attended the Lyceum later became mediums and ministers, including two daughters of the Harshman family who currently (2015) serve the Church, Rev. Ella Groves and Rev. Jane Fleming.

Canadian Association of Law Libraries

  • call
  • Corporate body
  • 1963-

The roots of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (C.A.L.L.) date back to the late 1950s. Several Canadian law librarians began to meet informally at the American Association of Law Libraries (A.A.L.L.) annual conference to discuss matters of interest. On July 5, 1963, C.A.L.L. became a formal association with its own Constitution and By-Laws. That same year, C.A.L.L. joined A.A.L.L. as an official chapter, with whom it remained affiliated until 1971. The first President of C.A.L.L. was Marianne Scott, with Eunice Beeson acting as Vice-President and Rosemary McCormick serving as Secretary. Future developments in law libraries across the nation, coupled with an increased level of interest amongst law librarians, led to the independent association that functions today. Currently, C.A.L.L. boasts approximately 500 members who represent a wide variety of law library interests throughout Canada. The Association serves as a forum for the dissemination of information and ideas, fosters cooperation among law libraries across the nation and plays an active role in promoting access to legal information for all Canadians.

C.A.L.L. is incorporated as a federal corporation without share capital under Part II of the Corporations Act. The objectives of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries are: to promote law librarianship, to develop and increase the usefulness of Canadian law libraries and to foster a spirit of co-operation among them; to provide a forum for meetings of persons engaged or interested in law library work and to encourage professional self-development; and to co-operate with other organizations which tend to promote the objects of the Association or the interest of its members.

Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Winnipeg Chapter

  • cfhu
  • Corporate body
  • 1948-

The Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University is a national, non-profit organization that develops and promotes awareness of, leadership in, and financial support for the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The Winnipeg Chapter was founded in 1948.

Canadian Institute of Actuaries

  • cia
  • Corporate body
  • 1965-

The Canadian Institute of Actuaries is the national organization of the actuarial profession in Canada. It was established by an Act of the federal parliament on March 18, 1965. The original organization of actuaries in Canada, the Actuaries Club, was founded in 1907 with 24 charter members, all actuaries living and working in Toronto. The Canadian Association of Actuaries was established October 8, 1946 and included all members of the Actuaries Clubs of Toronto and Winnipeg as well as a group of Montreal actuaries. This was the organization that formed the membership basis of the Canadian Institute of Actuaries in 1965. Since its formation, the Canadian Institute has grown steadily to its present size of about two thousand, five hundred member Fellows.

Canadian Officers Training Corps

  • cotc
  • Corporate body
  • 1914-1966

The University of Manitoba's Canadian Officer's Training Corps (C.O.T.C.) began in 1914 as a patriotic response to the outbreak of war in Europe. A series of meetings were held in September 1914 to organize a training program to prepare male students for active service overseas. The University Council appointed a Committee on Military Instruction which authorized the teaching of military science and tactics. A university corps was organized in the fall semester of the 1914-1915 year with 64 students taking extra classes to qualify as officers. Later, in March 1915, the Department of Defence instructed the University of Manitoba to join other universities throughout Canada to establish an official training curriculum under the auspices of the Canadian Officer Training Corps. Eight companies of sixty men each were formed with Professor E.P. Featherstonhaugh serving as captain and adjutant. In 1915 the Western Universities Battalion was established with the University of Manitoba contributing a company and a platoon. With the introduction of conscription legislation in 1917, military training was made compulsory for all male students. After the war, in 1920, the C.O.T.C. was reorganized by Lt. Col. N.B. Maclean. It continued in relative obscurity for nearly twenty years until the Second World War.

With the outbreak of the Second World War, the C.O.T.C. was quickly revitalized and its membership mushroomed from its peacetime level of 150 personnel to over 800. The Senate also passed regulations relating to academic credits or "bonuses" for students who joined the C.O.T.C. By 1941 all male students were once again required to enlist in a compulsory program of military training. After the war the C.O.T.C. continued to offer military training on a voluntary basis with new modernized and attractive programs, but with the return of peace its popularity rapidly declined with the organization dissolving in 1966.

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